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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 231 231 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 110 110 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 85 85 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 26 26 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1851 AD or search for 1851 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. Thompson renews his old triumphs in the Eastern and Middle States, and takeous indispositions which now and again, throughout the year 1851, drove the editor of the Liberator from his post to a sick ave enjoyed the Soiree, wrote Wendell Phillips Ms. Mar. 9, 1851. to Elizabeth Pease: perfectly extempore—so much so thaf Shadrach was one of four which, preeminently, in the year 1851, revealed to the North the real meaning of the Fugitive Sla as was first made clear when, on February Lib. 21.30. 15, 1851, pending a postponement of Shadrach's case before CommissioDeficiency Bill by the Senate of the 31st Congress (session 1851-52) for Judicial Expenses was ascribed to the execution of y are earnestly active for, its enforcement. The Boston of 1851 is not the Boston of 1775. Boston has now become a mere shesidue of it will come out on Monday. Perhaps you Dec. 8, 1851. will think that I go too far in enjoining it upon all men
ermined the Free Soil Party by indefinite postponement of the issue of slavery extension. As the New York Tribune said in 1851, from the point of view of Henry Clay: There being no longer any immediate danger of the extension of slavery, the feelingdies' A. S. Society (Dublin: Webb & Chapman, 1852). A year before, Mr. McKim, in writing to Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 25, 1851. on another topic, asked if the rumor were true that he believed in the spiritual origin of the so-called Rochester knockiP. Rogers, who died in 1846. He first Oct. 16. heard of this from William C. Nell, a colored Bostonian Ms. Sept. 15-17, 1851. temporarily assisting Frederick Douglass with his paper. He reprinted it in May, 1852, from Friend Post's Voices Lib. , 1851, sent another message of reconciliation through Ms. Oliver Johnson by a boy medium near Waterloo, N. Y., Nov. (?) 1851. O. Johnson to W. L. G. and who became from that time truly a familiar spirit to Mr. Garrison—sometimes notably, and so co
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
nd consented to take part in the proceedings. He shared the hospitality of the Davises with H. C. Wright, Parker Lib. 23.95. Pillsbury, and Joseph Barker, the last-named being chosen to preside over the Convention. Barker had apparently taken permanent leave of his native England, having purchased a farm in Ohio and removed thither with his Lib. 23.11. family. On his preliminary visit to this country he had received from Mr. Garrison in Boston attentions like those Ms. Albany, Apr. 19, 1851. he had bestowed in England. Once settled, he identified himself with the abolitionists, writing copiously for the J. Barker to W. L. G.; ante, p. 174. Liberator, and finding there admission (which Edmund Quincy denied to it in the Liberty Bell) for an article Lib. 22.80; Ms. Jan. 13, 1853, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. showing that; since the Bible sanctioned slavery, the book must be demolished as a condition precedent to emancipation. In November, 1852, he had been prime mover in a Bible Co
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
tic forebodings had a solid substratum in the signs of the times. Never was the Slave Power more insolent in its consciousness of strength, or wilder in its delirium of empire. See, for the undisguised purpose of President Pierce's Administration to annex Cuba, Lib. 24: 85, 127, 130, 189, 194; and, for the ancillary intrigue to acquire Samana Bay in San Domingo—a menace also to the independence and liberty of Hayti— Lib. 24: 157, 159; 25: 1, 61. Lieut. Herndon's exploration of the Amazon in 1851, by direction of the Navy Department, had distinct reference to a pro-slavery colonization with an ultimate view to annexation (Lib. 24: 62). On the other hand, see the numerous expressions of the Southern press looking to a restoration of the slave trade (Lib. 24: 149, 173), and in particular Henry A. Wise's letter to the Rev. Nehemiah Adams, D. D. (Lib. 24: 150). I would, said the Virginian, recommend the repeal of every act to suppress the slave trade. In November, 1856, the Governor of S
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
tirely convince my mind of the inexpediency of a change. 1. It is too late, as Mr. Robinson has been already authorized Marius R. Robinson. by me to engage a hall in Cleveland. 2. Cleveland and the West have been freely spoken of as the locality by the Standard and other papers. 3. The Ohio friends are stronger and stronger for Cleveland, as time advances; especially Robinson and Brooke. Samuel Brooke. 4. Bradburn, who at first dissuaded us from Cleveland, now advises it; In 1851, George Bradburn, who, after giving up the Lynn Pioneer, had been associated with Elizur Wright on the Boston Chronotype, removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and became one of the editors of the True Democrat (afterwards the Leader). He had greatly impaired his health by taking the stump for Fremont (Life of Bradburn, pp. 229, 233). and Mr. Tilden, M. C., Daniel R. Tilden, a native of Connecticut, Representative in Congress of Ohio, 1843-47. See in Sanborn's Life of John Brown, p. 609, Brown's l