hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 231 231 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 110 110 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 85 85 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 26 26 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 15 15 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1851 AD or search for 1851 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
than a Jacobin, and years after his removal assured a friend that it was a comfort to live in New York rather than in Boston. R. H. Dana, Jr., wrote to Sumner in 1851, Boston oligarchy is confined to the pavements and Nahant. Prescott wrote to Sumner in 1851 of a former period in Salem similar in character: Judge Story in his e1851 of a former period in Salem similar in character: Judge Story in his early days was exposed to much obloquy from the bitterness of party feeling, which becomes more intensified in proportion to the narrowness of the sphere where it is displayed. Boston is worse than New York in this respect. The capitalists were greatly interested in a protective tariff, and its maintenance was the one end of tho the conventional standard. Men of courage who pushed moral principles into politics were stigmatized as fanatics and demagogues. A Frenchman visiting Boston in 1851 found that the mention of Sumner's name in social life made certain people shiver (frissonner), because he was a Free Soiler, and suspected of abolitionism, though
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
include this lecture in his two volumes published in 1850, and used it again in the winter of 1850-51 at different places in the State,—as at Newton, Stoughton, Greenfield, and Deerfield. As showimerson's desire that he should undertake the work. From various quarters during the years 1845-1851 he was solicited for addresses, articles, and editorial service, which he declined on account of already referred to concerning friction matches, on which he was still employed in the summer of 1851; Ante, vol. II. p. 292. one concerning a rotary-power stocking loom; and another concerning a cith so much unalloyed pleasure. William W. Story had now established his home in Italy; but in 1851 he was in Boston carrying his Life of his father through the press,—a work in which Sumner naturatever you do I shall know is done with sincerity and high purposes. During the period of 1845-1851 Sumner was well remembered by his English and other foreign friends. Our three successive mini
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
that period a place in Fillmore's reactionary Cabinet, and ten years later was the foremost compromiser with an incipient rebellion. A brief mission to Mexico closed his public life; and resuming the practice of the law at Washington in the midst of the Civil War, he had no inspirations for the period, and sadly confessed, I am but a tradition. A. P. Russell's Sketch of Thomas Corwin, p 111. He ended as a man of such weak moral fibre is always likely to end. From December, 1846, until 1851, when he entered the Senate, Sumner was in frequent and confidential communication with Joshua R. Giddings. Some of this correspondence will be found in Julian's Life of Giddings, pp. 202, 204, 210-214, 217, 222, 227, 247, 260. Among the leaders of the antislavery cause in the House of Representatives, Giddings is entitled to hold in history the foremost place. He combined vigilance, prudence, readiness, self-possession, and a courage, moral and physical, which never failed. In a period
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
892. other delegates, who approved their public protest against General Taylor's nomination, and it was decided to call a national convention to be held at Buffalo in August. The two protesting delegates from Massachusetts upon their return home addressed their constituents,—Wilson by letter, and Allen in person,—both reviewing the proceedings at Philadelphia, and summoning the people to reject them. Boston Whig, June 19 and 24. 1848. Wilson gave an account of this period, including 1845-1851, in a speech in the Massachusetts Senate, Feb. 24, 1852 (Boston Commonwealth, March 1, 1852), and in a letter to L. V. Bell (Commonwealth, July 14, 1852). The meeting. which was addressed by Allen, passed a resolution which deserves a perpetual record: Massachusetts wears no chains and spurns all bribes; she goes now, and will ever go, for free soil and free men, for free lips and a free press, for a free land and a free world. The call already prepared was at once issued, with a list of sig
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
o had recently escaped, and on arriving in Boston had found wise and brave protectors in Theodore Parker, Dr. Henry I. Bowditch, Ellis Gray Loring, and Mrs. George S. Hillard. They were skilfully secreted and sent to England. The next February (1851), when the case of Shadrach was pending before G. T. Curtis, a commissioner, a body of colored men forced the door of the court room, and the negro, being taken from the officers, escaped to Canada. President Fillmore at once issued a proclamatiooking on the face of a judge,—an allusion to the unjudicial and unconstitutional powers delegated to commissioners under the Fugitive Slave Act. A discharge was refused; and this was the last effort to save Sims. In the session of Congress 1850-1851 the partisans of the Compromise measures—mostly members from slave States— subscribed a compact pledging themselves to maintain the settlement effected by these measures, and not to support as candidates for President and Vice-President, or for me<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. ZZZr. Webster's speech of March 7 was received by Northern members of Congress w, 23, 1850. It approved the Compromise when offered by Clay, and during 1850 and 1851 defended it in elaborate articles, urging pertinaciously the duty of good citizeenemies. Yours faithfully, G. S. H. Sumner sent Hillard, in the autumn of 1851, Horace Mann's speeches on slavery recently collected in a volume. Hillard ackn hardly can invest my ingenuous, eager, young, slim friend of 1839 (was it?) and 1851 with such august and weighty and venerable associations as throng around the cur other antislavery men against Winthrop's political course at this period, 1846– 1851, regarded him with great respect, and deeply regretted that he did not take his ial tribute to Washington. Those who contended against him in the years 1846 to 1851, and have known him in his old age, regret only that he did not take his place w<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. Sumner left Boston for Washington Nov. 25, 1851. He had three partings which touched his heart,—with his mother and sister at the family home, and with Howe and Longfellow. Howe wrote to him: You are now to be lost to us; and though when here I do not see much of you, still it makes me sad to think I shall no longer have the power when I have the will to get near you foy to refute one of his reasons for supporting it. Sumner, it is worth mention in this connection, had at this time no steady and consistent support among the journals of Boston. The Free Soil organ, the Commonwealth, which was founded early in 1851, had a very uncertain and changeable management. At times Alley, Bird, Dr. Howe, and Joseph Lyman were pecuniarily interested in it, and for some months Samuel E. Sewall was the proprietor. Dr. Howe, Bird, Dr. Palfrey, Robert Carter, 1819-
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. During the years 1851-1853, Whigs and Democrats acted in concert for the suppression of antislavery agitation. Forty-four members of Congress, in January, 1851, under the lead of Henry Clay and Alexander H. Stephens, pledged themselves, as already seen, to resist any disturbance of the Compromise, or a renewal of agitation upon the subject of slavery. Ante, p. 194. At the beginning of the next session, in December, 1851, the caucus of Whig members affirmed, almost unanimously, the Compromise Acts to be a final settlement, in principle and substance, of the dangerous and exciting subjects which they embrace. The Whig members from Massachusetts were reported to have voted in caucus as follows: for the Compromise, G. T. Davis, Duncan, and Thompson; against it, Fowler, Goodrich, and Scudder. The House, April 5, 1852, by a vote of one hundred to sixty<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
, and repeating the declarations and resolves which in them had been denounced as unpatriotic and treasonable. They were the demonstrative part of the audience; while the commercial Whigs, who had been toned down by the Compromise policy of 1850, 1851, and 1852, were less responsive. The antislavery veterans walked with heads erect, meeting on all sides the salutation You were right in State and Milk streets, where before they had encountered only averted faces. Adams's Biography of Dana, v0, which betrayed us all through the Union. The excitement in Boston surpassed any known in its previous history. Various circumstances conspired to this end. It was an unfamiliar spectacle, as the last fugitive-slave case was that of Sims in 1851. The repeal of the Missouri Compromise had sundered the tie which bound conservatism to slavery, and arrayed the mass of good citizens against the further extension of slavery. The spell of compromise had been broken, and the sentiment was wides
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
ncy behind you. Where is there a senator who holds by such a tenure? The day has come we have all hoped and labored for,—the day of something like unanimity in New England. Wilson wrote, January 19: What a change here since you took your seat in 1851! And what a change in our State since 1851, when you were elected by one majority! Your case is an illustration of the progress of our cause in the country. . . . How hopeful it is! All we have to do now is to labor on in faith of ultimate succ1851, when you were elected by one majority! Your case is an illustration of the progress of our cause in the country. . . . How hopeful it is! All we have to do now is to labor on in faith of ultimate success. During the summer Sumner flattered himself at times that he was nearly restored, and so assured others; but such hopes were soon darkened by relapses. As the autumn wore away without any certain progress, his most thoughtful friends, while clinging to hope, began to have serious apprehensions that his injury was permanent, or at the best they felt that a long struggle was before him. His sensitive, sympathetic temperament was doubtless a part of his case, making recovery less steady an
1 2