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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 250 250 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 146 146 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 50 50 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 25 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 19 19 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1852 AD or search for 1852 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852- (search)
Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852- Painter; born in Philadelphia. April 1, 1852; was educated at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts, and in 1871 entered the publishing house of Harper & Brothers, for which he went to England in 1878. He became widely noted for his book illustrations, and in 1890 exhibited his first painting, A May day morning. He became an associate of the Royal Academy and of the Royal Water Color Society in London, and was an American juror on painting at the Paris Exposition of 1900. The last of his notable works in the United States was the design of a series of paintings illustiating the Holy Grail for the walls of the new Public Library in Boston. In March, 1901, he was commissioned by King Edward VII. to paint the scene of his coronation in Westminster Abbey.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 (search)
: born in Westford, Mass., Jan. 18, 1793; entered the navy as midshipman at the beginning of the War of 1812: served first on the frigate President, and next on Lake Champlain with Commodore Macdonough, who when he asked Abbot if he were ready to die for his country received the reply: Certainly, sir; that is what I came into the service for. He was then ordered to enter the British lines as a spy and destroy a number of spars which had been stored at Sorel. For his success in this dangerous exploit and for his bravery in the engagement at Cumberland Head on Sept. 11, 1814, he received a sword of honor from Congress and was commissioned a lieutenant. He was given charge of the pirate ship Mariana in 1818; promoted commander in 1838; and in the following year was given command of the Boston navy-yard. During Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1852 Abbot commanded the Macedonian, and later was appointed flag-officer of the squadron. He died in Hong-Kong, China, Dec. 14, 1855.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 (search)
Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 Physician and surgeon; born in New York City, Aug. 8, 1830; was graduated at Columbia College in 1849, and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1852, subsequently continuing his studies in Europe. He became surgeon-general of the State of New York in 1858, and at the beginning of the Civil War was appointed medical director of the New York State Volunteer Hospital. During the war he was also one of the most influential members of the United States Sanitary commission (q. v.). After the war he gave much attention to opthalmology, founded the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital, and became Clinical Professor of the Diseases of the Eye and Ear in the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Agnew was actively identified with the educational institutions of New York City, and was one of the founders of the Columbia College School of Mines. He died in New York, April 8, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ainsworth, Frederick Crayton, 1852- (search)
Ainsworth, Frederick Crayton, 1852- Military officer; born in Woodstock, Vt., Sept. 11, 1852; was appointed a first lieutenant and assistant surgeon in the United States army in 1874; promoted major and surgeon in 1891; colonel and chief of the Record and Pension Office in the War Department in 1892; and brigadier-general in 1899. He invented and introduced the index-record card system, by the use of which the full military history of any soldier may be immediately traced. About 50,000.000 of these cards have been placed on file, and their introduction has resulted in a yearly saving of more than $400,000. In 1898 he succeeded Gen. George W. Davis as supervisor of the publication of the official records of the Civil War.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Horatio, 1834-1899 (search)
Alger, Horatio, 1834-1899 Author; born in Revere, Mass., Jan. 13, 1834; graduated at Harvard in 1852. After spending several years in teaching and journalism he was ordained as a Unitarian minister in 1864. He removed to New York City in 1866. He published Bertha's Christmas vision; Nothing to do, a poem; Frank's campaign, or, what a boy can do; Helen Ford, a novel; a volume of poems; Ragged Dick; Luck and pluck; Tattered Tom; Frank and fearless; His young Bank messenger, etc. He died in Natick, Mass., July, 18, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alvey, Richard Henry, 1826- (search)
Alvey, Richard Henry, 1826- Jurist; born in St. Mary's county, Md., in March. 1826; was educated in St. Mary's College: admitted to the bar in 1849. He was elected a Pierce Presidential elector in 1852, and a member of the Michigan State Constitutional Convention in 1867. He served as chief judge of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, and as a justice of the Michigan Court of Appeals in 1867-83, and as chief-justice of that court in 1883-93. On Jan. 1, 1896. President Cleveland appointed him a member of the Venezuelan Boundary Commission (see Venezuela question).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- (search)
Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- American reformer; born in South Adams, Mass., Feb. 15, 1820. She was of Quaker parent-age, and received her education at a Friends' school in Philadelphia. From 1835 to 1850 she taught school in New York. In 1847 she began her efforts in behalf of the temperance movement, making speeches and organizing societies; in 1852 she assisted in organizing the Woman's New York State Temperance Society. In 1854-55 she held conventions in each county in New York in behalf of female suffrage. She was a leader in the anti-slavery movement, and one of the earliest advocates of the coeducation of women. Greatly through her influence, the New York legislature, in 1860, passed the act giving married women the possession of their earnings, and the guardianship of their children. In 1868, with Mrs. E. C. Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, she began the publication of the Revolutionist, a paper devoted to the emancipation of women. In 1872 she cast test ballots at t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aqueducts. (search)
e at Syracuse. The most famous Roman aqueducts were the Aqua Apia, 10 miles in length; the Aqua Martia, 60 miles; the Aqua Julia, 15 miles, and the Aqua Claudia, 46 miles. With the exception of the Claudia, all these were constructed before the birth of Christ. Among the most important aqueducts in the United States are the following: The old Croton, New York City, built 1837-42, length, 38 1/4 miles, capacity, 100 million gallons daily. The new Croton, built 1884-90, length 30 1/2 miles, capacity, 250 million gallons daily. Washington Aqueduct, built 1852-59, two 4-foot pipes. Boston, from Sudbury River, built 1875-78, length, 16 miles. Baltimore, from Gunpowder River, built 1875-81, length, 7 miles. The Sutro tunnel, 4 miles long, constructed to drain the Comstock Lode, Nevada, at a depth of 1,600 feet. It was chartered February 4, 1865, and completed June 30, 1879. Many important works for the purpose of irrigation are now under construction in the Western States of the Union.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
presentation in that body, and the administration of the government was transferred to the civil authority. Population in 1890, 1,125,385; in 1900, 1,311,564. Territorial Governors of Arkansas.  Term of Office. James Miller1819 to 1825 George Izard1825 to 1829 John Pope1829 to 1835 William S. Fulton1835 to 1836 State Governors of Arkansas. James S. Conway1836 to 1840 Archibald Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hughes1885 to 1889 James P. Eagle1889 to 1893 Wm. M. Fishback1893 to 1895 James P. Clarke1895 to 1897 Daniel W. Jones1897 to 1901 Jefferson Davis1901 to---- United States Senators fr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- (search)
Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- Philanthropist; born in Stockbridge, N. Y., May 16, 1832; received a public school education. In 1852-56 he was a miner in California; in 1856-63 engaged in the commission business in Milwaukee, Wis., and then became a member of the firm of Plankinton, Armour & Company, meat packers. Mr. Armour was a man of large benevolence. In 1892 he built the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago at a cost of $1,500,000, and in the same year endowed it with $1,400,000; in 1898 he increased this endowment by $500,000; and in 1899 made another addition of $750,000. He died in Chicago, Jan. 6, 1901.
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