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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 250 250 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 146 146 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 50 50 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 25 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 19 19 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1852 AD or search for 1852 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ations for their support—constantly maintained their organization in a state of efficiency and readiness for service at the individual cost of the members. Such was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war with Mexico the military enthusiasm very much weakened; organization after organization was disbanded, leaving the Washington Artillery almost alone, struggling and apathetic. In 1852 it was found necessary again to rally for another reorganization. In June of that year, General E. L. Tracy was elected Captain, then Soria, who was killed by the premature explosion of a cartridge. After the lamented death of Soria, the company languished and lost in numbers and in spirit to such an extent that it seemed to be upon the verge of dissolution. For five long and uneventful years it clung to its existence, and when its numbers were reduced to thirteen members, I, your humbl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
ations for their support—constantly maintained their organization in a state of efficiency and readiness for service at the individual cost of the members. Such was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war with Mexico the military enthusiasm very much weakened; organization after organization was disbanded, leaving the Washington Artillery almost alone, struggling and apathetic. In 1852 it was found necessary again to rally for another reorganization. In June of that year, General E. L. Tracy was elected Captain, then Soria, who was killed by the premature explosion of a cartridge. After the lamented death of Soria, the company languished and lost in numbers and in spirit to such an extent that it seemed to be upon the verge of dissolution. For five long and uneventful years it clung to its existence, and when its numbers were reduced to thirteen members, I, your humbl