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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 314 314 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 148 148 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 49 49 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 48 48 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 24 24 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 17 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1853 AD or search for 1853 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
ioned Sumner as one of the distinguished men of the city, to the chagrin of the conservatives who had charge of the entertainment. Richard H. Dana, Jr., taking in 1853 Sumner letters of introduction to England, wrote gratefully, Sept. 9, 1853: Lord Elgin received me very kindly, and spoke of you with great interest and affection.ten submitted their manuscripts or first proofs to him, and they came back so changed that the authors could hardly identify their own compositions. He read, in 1853, the proofs to Mrs. Stowe's Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. Those much younger than himself submitted to this rough handling; others rose in insurrection against his sev with Edmond de Lafayette, grandson of the General, in August, 1850, and Jean J. Ampere, Ampere's Promenade en Amerique, vol. II. p. 36. Revue des deux Mondes, 1853, p. 20. friend of Tocqueville, in September, 1851, all of whom he took pleasure in escorting to places of interest. In a letter written in April, 1848, Sumner e
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
l ally of the capital of the city, which was heavily invested in manufacturing enterprises. It found in Mr. Winthrop a public man who fully represented its interests and spirit, and it remained loyal to him from the beginning of his career until 1853, when its power over the politics of the State was broken by the disruption of the Whig party. But made as he was and fitted as he was to represent the ruling class of Boston at the time when he entered on public life, his part was not to be thatsometimes found it necessary to send him a warning from Cambridge that some one was with them whom it was not best for him to meet. Even his triumphant career—his election to the Senate and his fame as an orator—did not soften this animosity. in 1853, driving down Beacon Street towards the country with R. H. Dana, Jr., as his companion, he said: There was a time when 1 was welcome at almost every house within two miles of us, but now hardly any are open to me. He was taken to the Wednesday Cl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
articles bearing the ear-marks of another than the editor) made every effort to give the controversy a personal direction, habitually naming the leading offenders, —Adams, Sumner, Allen, Wilson, Palfrey, Keyes, and Bird. The Webster Whigs in 1850 became very bitter against Schouler because, his original and better instincts now prevailing over his political connections, he refused to support Webster's compromise course; and in consequence he was obliged to leave the Atlas in the spring of 1853, and later in the same year he assumed the charge of the Cincinnati Gazette. Adams, for whom the most venomous shafts were reserved, was described in that journal as a political huckster, who lives upon the reputation as well as the wealth of his ancestors, intense egoism being the characteristic of his appearance, and selfishness that of his action; Palfrey was a Judas; Sumner, a transcendental lawyer. Adams, Sumner, and Palfrey were styled The Mutual Admiration Society, or Charles Sumner &
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
J. D. Baldwin, afterwards of Worcester, succeeded to the management in January, 1853. During 1853 Dr. Howe contributed a considerable number of articles to the editorial columns. Meanwhile the Wbe done. He renewed this proposition (reported as inexpedient) at almost every session,—as in 1853, 1854, 1856, 1860, 1861, 1862, and 1863,—till finally, when he moved it in 1866, it prevailed sube avoiding distinct political associations, was inclined to the Democratic party. He received in 1853 from Mr. Marcy, then Secretary of State, the offer of the post of assistant secretary, accompanie his brother's opinions—which compelled him to decline. Commonwealth, March 15, April 1 and 2, 1853. In the winter of 1852-1853 he appeared for the first time before lyceums, taking The Progress of1853 he appeared for the first time before lyceums, taking The Progress of Reform in France as his topic. Charles wrote to John Bigelow, March 26, 1853:— The post of assistant secretary of state was offered to my brother; but I write, not for any public correction o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
apter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. During the years 1851-1853, Whigs and Democrats acted in concert for the suppression of antislavery agitation. Forty-1853, Whigs and Democrats acted in concert for the suppression of antislavery agitation. Forty-four members of Congress, in January, 1851, under the lead of Henry Clay and Alexander H. Stephens, pledged themselves, as already seen, to resist any disturbance of the Compromise, or a renewal of agitation upon the subject of slavery. Ante, p. 194 but his vote in the caucus fell considerably below that of Everett, who was nominated and elected early in the session of 1853. To Sumner, and indeed to the Free Soilers generally, this result was very agreeable. It was easy for him to keep up fr grow (in the bustle of Washington you perhaps never feel old), the more I value old friends. A convention was held in 1853 to revise the Constitution of Massachusetts, which was made in 1780, and first revised in 1820. The Free Soilers and Demo<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. Chase and Sumner were the only two Free Soil senators in the Thirty-third Congress, the first in the Administration of Franklin Pierce, which began its session Dec. 5 to any action which would recognize him as a Whig,. Everett's action in the Whig caucus was discussed in the Boston papers,—the Commonwealth, Dec. 26, 29, 30, 1853; and the Courier and Journal the same month. The National Era, Jan. 5, 1854, contrasted Everett's treatment of his colleague with D. S. Dickinson's magnanimous co1853. Many Free Soilers in that city, who resented the interposition of the Catholic Church against the new Constitution, entered it at once after their defeat in 1853, and made their influence felt in its early proceedings in Massachusetts. Others of them, after the failure of the attempted fusion in July, 1854, joined it,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
ll, in Madison County, in company with whom he examined the former's breeds of cattle, sheep, and horses, for which that State is famous. They drove together over fine roads to the well-equipped farm of Mr. Clay's brother, Brutus J., near Paris. This was the first and only time in his life that Sumner could freely inspect the condition of slaves on a plantation. Thirty years later, Mr. Clay gave the following account of the visit: Mr. Sumner's acquaintance I first made, I believe, in 1853, at the banquet given to John P. Hale in Boston. Subsequently I invited him to visit me in Kentucky at my present home in Madison County, which he did. I was a breeder of pure-blooded short-horns and Southdown sheep, in seeing which he seemed much interested. The Kentucky trees and landscape grounds about my house (thirty acres), with every indigenous tree of my own State and some exotic evergreens, seemed also to please him. In these things, however, he did not seem to be permanently conce
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
y. Congressional Globe, p. 1353. He then walked alone to the printing-office, and thence to Seward's. As nothing occurred that day, the apprehensions of his friends were allayed. Preston S. Brooks was then a member of the House from South Carolina, born at Edgefield Court House, living in Ninety-six, a township of some interest in Revolutionary history, and representing a cotton-planting district in the northwestern part of the State. He first came to Congress late in the session of 1852-1853. He made a speech (March 15, 1854) in favor of the Nebraska bill, and during the same session advocated at length (June 14) a southern route for the Pacific Railroad. These speeches show him to have been a person of only respectable ability, and his friends hardly claimed more for him. During his service hitherto, hardly three years in length, he had been a modest and orderly member, indulging in no acrimonious speech and keeping aloof from scenes of disorder; and his pacific manner and tem
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
in but change. I observed that there were two or three beautiful dogs which he petted le invited me to visit him in the country. Afterwards went to Madame de Circourt. Lamartine gave an interesting account of Soule Pierre Soule was in Europe 1853-1855. Having been appointed Minister to Spain in 1853. While there he joined in the Ostend Manifesto. at a dinner with Girardin, where were some eighteen persons, at which he undertook to vindicate slavery in a manner very ennuyeuse, while the c1853. While there he joined in the Ostend Manifesto. at a dinner with Girardin, where were some eighteen persons, at which he undertook to vindicate slavery in a manner very ennuyeuse, while the company held down their heads. May 5. Breakfasted at Madame Mohl's. Among the guests were Mrs. Stowe and Mr. Senior. Went to the Corps Legislatif, where, through the kindness of Comte de Kergorlay, I was accommodated with a seat in one of the tribunes. A member who came to me remarked that nous n'avons pas d'orages. Everything was very quiet. the debate was on a law regulating, courts-martial. Dined with Appleton; in the evening heard Ristori in Camilla, a piece of moderate merit, but ver
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
in such an assembly in America would be thrown out of the window; while, as the professor observed in recalling the incident, his presence at the ball, with his brown skin and crisp hair, excited no surprise. Other interesting acquaintances which Sumner made at Montpellier were Jules Renouvier, 1804-1860; archeologist, and author of various notes on the historical monuments of France and Italy, and of a book on the art of engraving in Italy, Germany, the Pays Bas, and France, published in 1853; born and always having his home in Montpellier; a republican during the reigns of Louis Philippe and Louis Napoleon. He made long calls on Sumner, during which they talked on French literature. who had collected the best engravings and had a rare technical knowledge of the art, and Saint Rene Taillandier, 1817-1879; distinguished in literary and historical studies, one of his papers being entitled, La Promenade du Peyrou et la Cathedrale de Montpellier; member of the French Academy; prof
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