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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 285 results in 264 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 (search)
Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 Naval officer: born in Westford, Mass., Jan. 18, 1793; entered the navy as midshipman at the beginning of the War of 1812: served first on the frigate President, and next on Lake Champlain with Commodore Macdonough, who when he asked Abbot if he were ready to die for his country received the reply: Certainly, sir; that is what I came into the service for. He was then ordered to enter the British lines as a spy and destroy a number of spars which had been stored at Sorel. For his success in this dangerous exploit and for his bravery in the engagement at Cumberland Head on Sept. 11, 1814, he received a sword of honor from Congress and was commissioned a lieutenant. He was given charge of the pirate ship Mariana in 1818; promoted commander in 1838; and in the following year was given command of the Boston navy-yard. During Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1852 Abbot commanded the Macedonian, and later was appointed flag-officer of the squadron. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- (search)
Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- Naturalist; born in Neuchatel, Switzerland, Dec. 17, 1835: son of Prof. Louis Agassiz; came to the United States in 1849; and was graduated at Harvard College in 1855, and at Lawrence Scientific School in 1857. He was curator of the Natural History Museum, in Cambridge, in 1874-85: has since been engaged in important zoological investigations; and became widely known by his connection with the famous Calumet and Hecla copper-mines. The University of St. Andrews conferred the honorary degree of Ll.D. upon him, April 2, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural implements. (search)
thed cutters and guards, which was immediately put into practical operation, and proved thoroughly satisfactory. In 1834, Cyrus H. McCormick, then of Virginia, and late of Chicago, took out the first patent on his reaper, which has since come into such general use. This reaper, with improvements patented in 1845 and 1847, received the first prize at the World's Fair of 1851, where American reapers were first introduced to the notice of Europeans. At the International Exhibition at Paris, in 1855, American reapers were brought into competition with others, each machine being allowed to cut an acre of standing oats near Paris. The American reaper did its work in twenty-two minutes, the English in sixty, and an Algerian in seventy-two. It used a cutter similar to that of Hussey's machine, its main features being the reel, the divider, the receiving platform for the grain, and the stand for the raker. American reaping-machines are now used all over Europe where cereals abound. The au
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alden, James, 1810-1877 (search)
Alden, James, 1810-1877 Naval officer; born in Portland, Me.. March 31, 1810; became a midshipman in 1828; lieutenant in 1841; commander in 1855; captain, Jan. 2, 1863; commodore, July 25, 1866; and rear-admiral, June 19, 1871. He was a participant in the South Sea Exploring Expedition under Lieutenant Wilkes, and served under Commodore Conner on the Gulf coast of Mexico during the war with that country. He was active in the reinforcement of Fort Pickens; in the expedition against Galveston; as commander of the Richmond in the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip in the capture of New Orleans; and at Vicksburg, Port Hudson. Mobile Bay, and Fort Fisher. He was appointed chief of the Bureau of Navigation and Detail in 1869, and, after his promotion to rear-admiral, commander of the European squadron. He died in San Francisco, Cal., Feb. 6, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, 1836- (search)
Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, 1836- Author and editor; born in Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 11, 1836; entered upon mercantile life at an early age, and at the same time engaged in writing verses for the New York journals. The first collection of his poems was published, under the name of The bells, in 1855, when he was nineteen years of age. His most successful poem, Babie Bell, was published in 1856, and soon afterwards he abandoned mercantile for literary pursuits. In 1856 he joined the staff of the Home journal, published by Morris and Willis, in New York. He edited Every Saturday from its foundation. and from time to time contributed largely to periodical publications. From 1881 to 1890 he was the editor of the Atlantic monthly.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, George Leonard, 1828- (search)
Andrews, George Leonard, 1828- Military officer; born in Bridgewater, Mass., Aug. 31, 1828; was graduated at West Point in 1851, entering the engineer corps. He resigned in 1855. In 1861 he became first lieutenant-colonel and then colonel of the 2d Massachusetts Regiment. He was made brigadier-general in 1862, and led a brigade in Banks's expedition in Louisiana and against Port Hudson in 1863. He assisted in the capture of Mobile, and was appointed Professor of French at West Point Feb. 27, 1871; was retired Aug. 31, 1892; and died April 4, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- (search)
Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820- American reformer; born in South Adams, Mass., Feb. 15, 1820. She was of Quaker parent-age, and received her education at a Friends' school in Philadelphia. From 1835 to 1850 she taught school in New York. In 1847 she began her efforts in behalf of the temperance movement, making speeches and organizing societies; in 1852 she assisted in organizing the Woman's New York State Temperance Society. In 1854-55 she held conventions in each county in New York in behalf of female suffrage. She was a leader in the anti-slavery movement, and one of the earliest advocates of the coeducation of women. Greatly through her influence, the New York legislature, in 1860, passed the act giving married women the possession of their earnings, and the guardianship of their children. In 1868, with Mrs. E. C. Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, she began the publication of the Revolutionist, a paper devoted to the emancipation of women. In 1872 she cast test ballots at t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Atlantic Telegraph. (search)
re Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor, Marshall O. Roberts. Chandler White, and Cyrus W. Field. Twenty-five years afterwards. all but one (Mr. White) were living, and again met in the same room, and around the same table whereon that association was signed, with the same attorney of the association then engaged, David Dudley Field. Mr. Cooper was chosen president of the company. Mr. Field procured a cable in England to span the waters between Cape Ray and Cape Breton Island. It was sent out in 1855. and was lost in an attempt to lay it. It was recovered, and was suceessfully laid in 1856. The same year Mr. Field organized in London the Atlantic Telegraph Company to carry the line across the ocean. Mr. Field subscribed for one-fourth of the stock of the company. The American and British governments gave them aid in ships. and during 1857 and 1858 expeditions were at sea, laying a cable across the ocean to Valentia on the western coast of Ireland. Twice, in 1857, the attempt failed,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
Averill, William woods, 1832- Military officer; born in Cameron, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1832; was graduated at West Point in 1855. Entering the Mounted Rifles. he distinguished himself in New Mexico by the surprise and capture of a body of Indians. In that warfare he was severely wounded. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil War he was chosen colonel of a regiment of Pennsylvania cavalry, and became brigadier-general of volunteers in September. 1862. He had taken an active part in the battles on the Peninsula and in Pope's campaign in July and August, 1862. He reinforced Pleasonton in the advance after the battle of Antietam, and was afterwards very active in Virginia, especially in the mountain regions, in 1863. There had been comparative quiet in that region after the close of 1861 until the summer and fall of 1863, when General Averill, with a cavalry force, made extensive raids in that mountainous country. Before the close of that year he had nearly purged western Virg
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Theodorus, 1805-1877 (search)
Bailey, Theodorus, 1805-1877 Naval officer; born in Chateaugay, Franklin co., N. Y., April 12, 1805: entered the navy as midshipman in January, 1818. and was captain in 1855. In July, 1862, he was made commodore, and in July, 1866, rear-admiral on the retired list. In 1861 Captain Bailey was in command of the Colorado, in the Western Gulf squadron. and was second in command of the expedition under Butler and Farragut up the Mississippi to capture New Orleans. in the spring of 1862. His vessel was too large to pass the bar, and taking what men and guns he could spare. he went up the river in his boats as a volunteer, and assumed the command of the first division. He led in the desperate attack on Fort St. Philip. Fort Jackson, and the Confederate flotilla. It was one of the most gallant naval operations of the war; and Admiral Farragut specially commended Captain Bailey as the leader in that attack. In 1862 he was in command of the Eastern Gulf squadron, and was successfu
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