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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
r and Navarino. Sir William Molesworth; 1810-1855; member of Parliament; colleague of John Austininistration of the government of Malta, and, in 1855, Secretary of the Colonies. At the suggestion appointed Governor of the Ionian Islands, 1849-1855, and of Ceylon, 1855-1860. His father, Robert 1855-1860. His father, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; aI breakfast with Rogers. Samuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 until his death he lived in St. Jam dinner which Colburn, Henry Colburn died in 1855. His residence was at 13 Great Marlborough Stround him. Serjeant Wilde Thomas Wilde, 1782-1855. At the bar, he was noted for his industry andcame Duke of Somerset on his father's death, in 1855. had not been present. I think that Lady Seymoer in 1848, and was Lord-lieutenant of Ireland, 1855-1858, and again, 1859-1864. he was one of the Pleas in November of that year; he resigned in 1855, on account of ill-health; and was placed in th[1 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
ere Sir Edward Codrington; 1770-1851; admiral; distinguished at Trafalgar and Navarino. Sir William Molesworth; 1810-1855; member of Parliament; colleague of John Austin on a commission of inquiry into the administration of the government of Malta, and, in 1855, Secretary of the Colonies. At the suggestion of George Grote, he edited the works of Thomas Hobbes. He was associated with John Stuart Mill in editing the Westminster Review; and was a friend of Mr. Grote, in whose Personal Life,as Minister Plenipotentiary for acknowledging the Mexican Republic; and was appointed Governor of the Ionian Islands, 1849-1855, and of Ceylon, 1855-1860. His father, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De1855-1860. His father, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edwar
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
ut he has a power, a fulness of information and physical spirits, which make him more commanding than all! His great character and his predominating voice, with his high social and intellectual qualities, conspire to give him such an influence as to destroy the equilibrium, so to speak, of the table. He is often a usurper, and we are all resolved into listeners, instead of partakers in the conversational banquet; and I think that all are ill at ease. Brougham abused Miss Martineau most heartily. He thought that she excelled in stories, and in nothing else; and that she was a great ass for pronouncing so dogmatically on questions of policy and government. He exhorted me to write a book on England, to revenge my country of Basil Hall! To-morrow I breakfast with Rogers. Samuel Rogers, 1763-1855. From 1802 until his death he lived in St. James Place, London, looking into the Green Park. His courtesy and hospitality have been commemorated by many visitors from the United States.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
e time ago by Milman in the Quarterly, which she says will be the most important and valuable of the works she has presented to the public. She is desirous of reaping some advantage from its publication in America, and hopes to make some arrangement with a publisher to receive the sheets and reprint them. I have this very day received a letter from Sir David Brewster, expressing a similar wish. He is preparing a very valuable Life of Newton, in two or three octavo volumes, Published in 1855. which will contain most important extracts from the family papers in the possession of the Earl of Portsmouth, to all of which he has had access. This Life will throw great light upon Newton's religious opinions, and will prove him, under his own hand, to have been a Unitarian. I hope that we shall pass a law responsive to the British International Copyright Bill. Do write me about this measure, and what its chances are. You have read the Retrospective Review. I am indebted to it for
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
e simply, I think, than any person I have visited in England; but he possesses a palace of a mind. He is truly brilliant in conversation, and the little notes of his which I have seen are very striking. He is of about the middle size, with iron-gray hair parted in the middle, and suffered to grow quite long. Longfellow has seen him, I think, and he will tell you about him. I believe I have already described to you Carlyle. I met Campbell at a dinner which Colburn, Henry Colburn died in 1855. His residence was at 13 Great Marlborough Street. the publisher, gave me last evening. There were Campbell, Jerdan, William Jerdan, born 1782, for thirty-four years editor of the London Literary Gazette. and some six or eight of the small fry—the minims— of literature, all guilty of print. Campbell is upwards of sixty. He is rather short and stout, and has not the air of a gentleman. He takes brandy and water instead of wine. He did not get to throwing decanters or their stoppers; t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
the Crusaders, that strayed so far to seek In Golgotha Him dead, who lives in Heaven. And you are still firmer in office than ever,—therefore, farther from Washington and Athens. I have read the last debate carefully, and think the ministers came out of it most gallantly. Your own speech was all that I could wish,—fair, dignified, and bland, and most satisfactorily dealing with the points. Fox Maule's Baron Panmure, Earl Dalhousie, 1801-1874. He was Secretary of War, 1846-1852 and 1855-1858. read capitally; it was powerful from its business detail, and seemed to come from a gentlemanly and accomplished mind. Allow me to present compliments to Lord and Lady Carlisle, whose unaffected kindness to me the few times I had the pleasure of seeing them at Rome I shall not forget. I look forward to the pleasure of seeing you in London—that great World's Forum—before I leave for home. And when I am fairly on the other side, I trust that you will let me hear from you. Your chara