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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

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ted, a day or two later, from the view taken at the dinner referred to; and the former was always full of faith and hope in democracy as a means of social improvement, guided, as he did his best to guide it, by the ethical spirit. At a dinner for Morpeth at Abbott Lawrence's, Judge Story talked high conservatism. Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. i. p. 30. Thackeray, whose visit was a few years later, found a vast amount of toryism and donnishness everywhere. A Collection of Letters, 1847-1855, p. 165. Sumner, who was familiar with the talk at dinners and in drawing-rooms, wrote, in 1852, to his brother George, then in Europe: There are beautiful and generous spirits in Boston, but the prevailing tone of its society is provincial toryism. Persons freshly returned from Europe, who have hearts, are at first disturbed by it, then straightway adopt it. Witness the C——'s. Longfellow, referring to the proneness of some persons to find little good in their own country after returning
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
n caste, and of his persistent advocacy of equal civil and political rights for all, irrespective of condition and race, which continued through his life. Its general thought as well as some of its points and authorities appeared often in his prolonged contention in the Senate for the rights of the colored people. Chief-Justice Shaw gave the opinion of the court adversely to Sumner; Roberts v. City of Boston. Cushing's Reports, vol. v. p. 206. but the Legislature a few years later, in 1855, prohibited such separation of the races into different schools. Both races at once mingled in the same class-rooms without disturbance or inconvenience. To Sumner belongs the honor of leading the way in the contest with the spirit of caste. Dr. Palfrey wrote to him concerning his argument, You have done few things among your worthy acts to be remembered by yourself hereafter more to your satisfaction, or by posterity to your praise. Many years afterwards, in 1870, Sumner's argument was a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
ety decided to hold no more public meetings, and recalled the notice of one already announced. Mr. Ticknor and George T. Curtis attended the meeting where this decision was made, and both were chosen officers for the first time. They had taken no interest in the subject before, and their political hostility to Sumner and Dr. Howe, as well as Mr. Ticknor's kinship with Mr. Eliot, account for their selection. Eliot became president; and Dwight continued in office till his death, in 1854. In 1855 no officers were chosen, and Mr. Eliot took the chair in the presence of three reporters and only two members. The officers recommended a dissolution of the Society, for the reason that no suitable successor to Dwight could be found. There was a week's adjournment to consider the disposition of the funds, and there the record ends. A part of the amount still in the treasury was spent in the useless republication, in three huge volumes, of Dwight's reports, which were of little value in the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
He acted in 1852 with the Whigs; in 1856, 1860, and 1864 he opposed the Republicans, and then withdrew from political controversy. His old Free Soil adversaries had a kindly feeling towards him notwithstanding the asperities of their contests with him. Sumner, after the early part of 1848, abstained from all reflections upon his course, publicly or privately. One or two slight allusions in private correspondence do not seem to require a qualification of the general statement. Wilson, in 1855, formally invited him to join in the anti-Nebraska movement, which was the beginning of the Republican party; but made as he was, and seeing things as he saw them, he could not accept the overture. Wilson's Rise and Fall of the Slave Power, vol. II. p. 433. Whittier, while as positive as other antislavery men against Winthrop's political course at this period, 1846– 1851, regarded him with great respect, and deeply regretted that he did not take his place with the antislavery party. There
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
o failed in steadiness and adequate preparation for the contests of the Senate. Hamlin, of maine, was now opposed to any scheme for the extension of slavery, but was unhappily constrained by his position as a supporter of the Democratic party, then controlled by the slaveholding interest. Chase and Sumner were well known to each other before, both in correspondence and personal interviews, and their relations were to continue most intimate and confidential until the former's term expired in 1855. In point of ability and character the Senate was not then at its best. In an article on wade's retirement, March 4, 1869,—the date when Sumner became Father of the Senate,—the New York Tribune described the Senate as it was when he entered it, and ascribed to the three Free Soilers only a foresight into the real question of the future. Schouler, the correspondent of the Boston Atlas, Dec. 5, 1851, mentioned the incidents of the first day of the session, and particularly Clay's presenc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
ffer no shock during his official term if he had the power to avert it. The only political force against slavery, the Free Soilers, were helpless as an opposition, receiving no recruits and diminishing in numbers. The Administration, in Cushing's letter, threatened proscription to all who allowed any political fellowship with them. Hale, without hope of being called again into public life, had opened a law office in the city of New York. He was again elected senator from New Hampshire in 1855, and served till 1865. Chase was to be succeeded at the close of this Congress by a Democratic supporter of the Compromise. Three years and a half of Sumner's term remained; but the Whigs, rampant in their restoration to power in Massachusetts, were clamoring for his resignation as a senator without a constituency; and it appeared inevitable that his successor would be a supporter of the Compromise of Everett's type. Seward, whatever might be the impulses of his better nature, had descended
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. The second session of the Thirty-third Congress, which began in December, 1854, and ended in March, 1855, was, excepting a single day, undisturbed by excitement. There was a disposition on both sides to avoid a renewal of the discussion on slavery, which had absorbed the preceding session, and to attend rather to the ordinary public busitts in favor of the bill. The speech illustrated the hardships involved in the application of a technical rule of maritime law. An indictment against Theodore Parker was pending in the United States Circuit Court, Boston, in the winter of 1854– 1855, in which he was charged with resisting the process for the rendition of Anthony Burns, the alleged act of resistance being a speech he had delivered in Faneuil Hall. It was expected that the trial would take place before Judge B. R. Curtis.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. Congress met Dec. 3, 1855. The Republican senators now numbered nearly one fourth of the Senate, and their exelusion from committees was no longer attempted. Sumner, receiving thirty two votes, was again placed on the committee on pensions, of which the other members were Jones of Iowa (chairman), Clay of Alabama, Seward of New York, and Thompson of New Jersey. On Cass's motion he was appointed one of the two members of the committee on enrolled bills. Greeley, writing in the Tribune, Dec. 14, 1855, of Sumner as one whose reputation as scholar, orator, and statesman is not confined to this hemisphere, said: Mr. Sumner dangles at the tail of two unimportant committees. Such is slavery's confession that she feels the point of his spear,—a truth well known already to others, but never so plainly admitted till now. He spoke at length against the proposition to originate appropriation bills in the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
to the reception of the Comte de Colonna Walewski, Minister for Foreign Affairs. The hotel was splendid, and the company elegant. His resemblance to his father is marked, 1810-1868. Reputed son of Napoleon I., and minister of foreign affairs, 1855-1860. his manners cordial and distinguished. I made haste to speak of M. Boileau, the French secretary at Washington, and to commend him warmly. The minister coolly said that he had married a woman without fortune, and therefore could not await t change. I observed that there were two or three beautiful dogs which he petted le invited me to visit him in the country. Afterwards went to Madame de Circourt. Lamartine gave an interesting account of Soule Pierre Soule was in Europe 1853-1855. Having been appointed Minister to Spain in 1853. While there he joined in the Ostend Manifesto. at a dinner with Girardin, where were some eighteen persons, at which he undertook to vindicate slavery in a manner very ennuyeuse, while the compan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
rly has been in seeing Mrs. Jameson, whose conversation is clear, instructive, and most friendly, and in the Brownings; all of these have been full of kindness for me, and I like them all very much. In August he passed a day with the Grotes at St. Germain. Among French friends who came to him or communicated their interest were Auguste Carlier, He died in 1890, aged 87; author of La Republique Americaine. États Unis, and of different works on the United States, where he lived in the years 1855-1857. the Comte and Comtesse de Circourt, and Laboulaye. The last-named desired to know about Channing,—a topic always grateful to Sumner. Madame Mohl was his companion in a call at Rueil on M. and Madame Turgenev. Turgenev and his book. La Russie et les Busses, are mentioned in Sumner's speech on The Barbarism of Slavery, June 4, 1860; Works, vol. v. pp. 103, 104. He listened to a lecture on Schelling Printed in Memoires de l'academie des Sciences Morales et Politiques, vol. XI. p
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