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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
from the fault of imitation. He stands among men in towering and barbaric grandeur; in all the hardihood and rudeness of perfect originality; independent of the polish and beyond the reach of art. His vast outline and grand, but mild and undefined, proportions, liken him to a huge mass of granite, torn, in some convulsion of nature, from a mountain's side, which any effort of the chisel would only disfigure, and which no instrument in the sculptor's studio could grasp or comprehend. In 1855, during the rage of Know-Nothingism, he declared his opposition to the American Party, and stated the grounds of his objection, at Versailles, in one of his most forcible speeches. In 1856 he removed to Chicago. He complained that there was not room in Kentucky—that he had always been crowded. He determined to fix his home by the bright waters of the lake, in the young and rising city of the West. But his stay was not long. He returned to Kentucky in August of the same year that he had l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Burkett Davenport Fry. (search)
tain, commanding his company with signal gallantry in the Valley of Mexico and specially distinguishing himself at the battle of Chapultepec. His company was disbanded in August, 1848. Captain Fry now returned to civil life, and marrying Miss Martha A. Micou, of Augusta, Georgia, for some years resided in California; but the expedition of General William Walker again enlisted the adventurous spirit of Captain Fry, and he hastened to join the gray-eyed man of destiny. He reached Nicaragua in 1855, and threw himself heart and soul in the struggle. The terrible hardships to which the command was subjected are graphically depicted in the history of the ill-starred attempt. General Fry was ever in the front when peril was to be met, and was finally made Governor of Grenada. When the venture fell to pieces, through, as General Walker charges, the policy pursued by the United States and British Governments, General Fry returned to this country and settled in Alabama. At the breaking ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 24 (search)
on this subject, and it was published soon after his return by the American Journal of Science. Shortly after, he wrote another much-talked — of paper entitled The Relation of Terrestrial Magnetism to the Circulation of the Atmosphere. These small beginnings he soon expanded into his celebrated wind and current charts and sailing directions. These charts completely revolutionized commerce, said the Secretaries of the Navy (in their annual reports for the years 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855 and 1856), and have not only saved millions of dollars to those who go down to the sea in ships, but have added glory and honor to his country. A calculation of the amount saved to the commerce of the United States by shortening the voyages fifteen days by the use of these charts will show the following startling results: The average freight from the United States to Rio is 17.7 cents per ton per day; to Australia 20 cents. The mean of this is a little over 19 cents per ton per day, but to b