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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 260 260 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 232 232 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 63 63 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 45 45 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 25 25 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 22 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for 1856 AD or search for 1856 AD in all documents.

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brought him to the verge of the grave. His strong constitution at last brought him safely through. Writing about the middle of May, he says: I try my physical powers a little every day. I have been so little accustomed to sickness that I can hardly realize it, and find myself inclined constantly to jump up and go right off to work. He was gradually restored to strength and health, but did not recover his robust appearance until braced by a winter in Utah. During the summer and fall of 1856 all other interests were subordinate to the political struggle which resulted in the election of Mr. Buchanan, the Democratic candidate, over Fremont, the nominee of the Antislavery party. The following letters are inserted, because they clearly define General Johnston's views on the subject of abolitionism and his apprehensions at that time. On the 21st of August, writing from San Antonio to the author, he says: The best friends of the Union begin to feel apprehensions for its per
Chapter 13: the Mormon rebellion. The rise of Mormonism. Joseph Smith. his career. Brigham Young. Nauvoo. Salt Lake City. Utah. quarrels with Federal officials. the Danites. Reformation of 1856. a Hideous fanaticism. Buchanan's appointments. revolt. Young's proclamation. Mormon oratory. a Mountain stronghold. orders to the Saints. Mountain Meadows massacre. a late retribution. General Johnston, as commander of the United States troops employed to enforce the Feded apostate Saints under the combined influence of fanaticism, greed, and private vengeance. Elder Stenhouse, in the thirty-sixth chapter of his Rocky Mountain Saints, gives a terrible picture of the outburst of fanaticism in the Reformation of 1856. This was a revival begun by Jedediah M. Grant, in which the most dangerous dogmas of their church were pressed to their extremest consequences, and the whole population was in a ferment of religious frenzy. It has already been stated that whate
s and broke none, and was truthful and magnanimous. It was difficult to move him to anger, impossible to provoke him to revenge. He did not strive for wealth or place, and, as a citizen and statesman, was stainless and incorrupt. He seemed born under a star, and greatness sought him out. After a short military experience in Mexico, he was adopted by a State-rights coterie in Kentucky, by whom his fortunes were eagerly pushed. In 1851, and again in 1853, he was sent to Congress; and in 1856 was elected Vice-President, when only thirty-five years of age. He presided over the Senate with fairness and dignity in very troubled times. When the rupture took place in the Democratic party, he was selected at Baltimore as the nominee of the State-rights party for President. He continued until Lincoln's inauguration to preside over the Senate, when he took his seat in that body as Senator from Kentucky. With Breckinridge's powerful hold on all classes in Kentucky, it was in his powe
was born in 1815. He was graduated at West Point in 1838, when he was commissioned second-lieutenant in the Second Dragoons. He also attended the cavalry-school of Saumur, in France. He served in Florida and on the Plains; he was with Taylor at Monterey, and with Scott from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico, and was twice brevetted for gallant and meritorious service, coming out of the Mexican War captain and brevet lieutenant-colonel. In 1855 he was made major of the Second Cavalry, and in 1856 commandant of the Corps of Cadets at West Point, where he remained until 1860. He was best known as the author of the standard book on military tactics. On the secession of Georgia, he promptly followed the fortunes of his State. Hardee was first sent to command in Mobile Bay, but, in June, 1861, was promoted to brigadier-general, to take command in Eastern Arkansas. Here the diseases of camp and want of cooperation among the commanders prevented any valuable achievement. Under Genera
e President. The high rank given him has been cited by Pollard, who speaks of him as a captain in the old army, as a piece of favoritism. But this is an error. He was one of the senior officers who resigned. He was a graduate of West Point, of the year 1832. He resigned, and was reappointed a captain in the Mounted Rifles in 1846, was brevetted major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico, was made a major in 1848, and lieutenant-colonel in 1856. He was a Kentuckian, of a family distinguished for gallantry and talents, and known as an intelligent and intrepid officer; and it was hoped that his long service would enable him to supplement the inexperience of the gallant Zollicoffer. Crittenden took command of the district, November 24th, and made his headquarters at Knoxville. Thither General Johnston telegraphed him to dispatch without delay the supplies and intrenching-tools sent there for Zollicoffer, and to send at once a regime