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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 260 260 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 232 232 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 63 63 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 45 45 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 25 25 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 22 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1856 AD or search for 1856 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

ing woman's sob, no sister's tears, to soften the pathway of the young General into the great unknown. He died a soldier's death, and found a soldier's grave. The dirge of the military band, the random firing of the enemy, the touching ritual of the Episcopal Church, read by Mr. Hume, there in the pale moonlight, served as the requiem of one who gave himself to his country. General William P. Sanders was but twenty-eight years of age, a native of Kentucky, and a graduate of West-Point in 1856. When the war broke out he was First Lieutenant of dragoons. He was appointed Captain in the Sixth regulars, and distinguished himself in the Maryland and Peninsula campaigns. In 1863, he was appointed to the colonelcy of the Fifth Kentucky cavalry, but was retained by the Commanding General for special staff duties, and never joined the regiment. All are familiar with his achievements in the Morgan, Cluke, and Scott raids, as well as his own into East-Tennessee. He received his promotio
consist of twenty-four vessels of all classes in commission, of which half were in distant seas. The absurdity of the pretension of such a blockade, in the face of the authoritative declaration of the maritime rights of neutrals made at Paris in 1856, was so glaring, that the attempt was regarded as an experiment on the forbearance of neutral powers, which they would promptly resist. This conclusion was justified by the fact that the governments of France and Great Britain determined that it er nations to assume that every port of the coasts of the so-styled confederate States is effectively blockaded. When, in view of these facts, of the obligations of the British nation to adhere to the pledge made by their government at Paris in 1856, and renewed to this Confederacy in 1861, and of these repeated and explicit avowals of the imperfection, irregularity, and inefficiency of the pretended blockade of our coast, I directed our Commissioner at London to call upon the British governm