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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 320 320 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 206 206 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 68 68 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 46 46 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 21 21 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 20 20 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1857 AD or search for 1857 AD in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
ceive electoral votes at the North, nor a Northern Candidate who did not receive electoral votes at the South. At the late election and for the first time, this was not the case; and consequences the most extraordinary and deplorable have resulted. The country, as we have seen, being in profound peace at home and abroad, and in a state of unexampled prosperity — Agriculture, Commerce, Navigation, Manufactures, East, West, North, and South recovered or rapidly recovering from the crisis of 1857--powerful and respected abroad, and thriving beyond example at home, entered in the usual manner upon the electioneering campaign, for the choice of the nineteenth President of the United States. I say in the usual manner, though it is true that parties were more than usually broken up and subdivided. The normal division was into two great parties, but there had on several former occasions been three; in 1824 there were four, and there were four last November. The South equally with the We