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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 320 320 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 206 206 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 68 68 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 46 46 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 21 21 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 20 20 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1857 AD or search for 1857 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
the 23d, was killed at a point nearer to Washington than any other Confederate who fell in the war. Now, some words as to the careers, respectively, of Christie and Blacknall, the latter having succeeded the former as colonel of the regiment. Daniel Harvey Christie was born in Frederick county, Va., March 28, 1833. In early life he displayed a fondness for military studies, and was educated at a military school. He became a citizen of Henderson, Granville county, N. C., some time in 1857, taking charge of both the male and female schools of the town. Of the former he established the Henderson Military Institute. The breaking out of the war found him in this position. He was quick to bound into the ring of military life, upon which he was destined to reflect so much honor and glory. His first wound was received at Seven Pines. Again, at Cold Harbor, just after Seven Pines, he was severely wounded and carried from the field. Within sixty days he returned to the command, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Senate. On all the questions and topics belonging to this committee he had the unbounded confidence of his brother Senators of every party and section. His integrity, purity, and knowledge of affairs, gave him an almost absolute veto on everything corrupt, base or dangerous in fiscal legislation. He was deemed a safe, conservative man; a watch—dog of the Treasury—not a mere barking dog, but a faithful and incorruptible sentinel. He shaped and carried through the compromise tariff bill of 1857—a measure supported not only by the Democrats, but by many prominent northern Republicans, by William H. Seward, Henry Wilson, N. P. Banks, Salmon P. Chase, and others. They were content to follow a Virginian of the Virginians. His statement of what any provision in a bill he had in charge, meant or effected was enough. His candor and truth were a power and a pillar of fire. You have to-day at Washington, a great court to examine and consider claims against the United States Government. <