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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 320 320 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 206 206 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 68 68 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 46 46 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 21 21 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 20 20 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1857 AD or search for 1857 AD in all documents.

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l climate, whose staple productions none of those great countries can grow; with three thousand miles of coast line, indented with bays and crowded with islands, and its vast centre watered by the Mississippi, into whose bosom are poured thirty-six thousand miles of tributary streams. Let us see what the "goose that laid the golden egg" was doing before the experiment of "cutting it open" was undertaken by the North. The Census of 1850 and the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury for 1857 show that each inhabitant of the South, of all classes, produced $13.30 more than each individual at the North. The average agricultural production at the South was $58 to each person, when, at the North, it was only $44.70. The total agricultural productions for 1850 amounted to one thousand, one hundred and sixty four millions. Of this sum, the North produced, in round numbers, six hundred and four millions, and the South five hundred and sixty millions. Population of the United States f