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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 265 265 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 46 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 31 31 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for 1859 AD or search for 1859 AD in all documents.

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than four hundred millions of pounds; and of Rice, nearly two millions. Of Wool, our annual clip was over sixty millions of pounds, and our consumption probably double that amount. Of ginned Cotton, ready for market, our product was about one million of tuns, or more than Five Millions of bales of four hundred pounds each. Four hundred and sixty millions of pounds of Butter, and one hundred and five millions of pounds of Cheese, were likewise returned as our aggregate product for the year 1859. We made in that year three hundred and forty millions of pounds of Sugar, and more than twenty-five millions of gallons of Molasses. And, beside consuming all this, with twenty-five millions of pounds of home-made Honey, we imported from abroad to the value of over thirty-six millions of dollars. We dragged from our forests, not including fuel, Timber valued at more than Ninety-three Millions of dollars. We made Flour to the value of Two Hundred Millions. We manufactured over fifty-five
production of cotton in the Southern States has been augmented from some five or ten thousand bales in 1793 to over five millions of bales, or one million tons, in 1859; this amount being at least three-fourths in weight, and seven-eighths in value, of all the cotton produced on the globe. To say that this invention was worth onend enlarge this steadily growing demand up to the full measure of the momentarily checked production. The five millions of bales, produced by the United States in 1859-60, were sold as readily and quickly as the one million bales produced in 1830-31, and at considerably higher prices per pound. But the relatively frigid climatree a general sale of free negroes into absolute slavery were made in several States, barely defeated in two or three, and fully successful in one. Arkansas, in 1858-9, enacted the enslavement of all free colored persons within her limits, who should not remove beyond them before the ensuing 4th of July, and this atrocious edict wa
d and lost, in obedience to directions from Washington--Mr. Douglas's apprehended return being exceedingly distasteful to President Buchanan. The Elections of 1859 were not especially significant, save that, in New York, what remained of the American party, instead of nominating a State ticket of their own men, adopted the exenacting the laws of God by prohibiting it there, had scarcely died out of the public ear, when the Legislature of that vast Territory proceeded, at its session in 1859, to do the very thing which he had deemed so inconceivable. Assuming the legal existence of Slavery in that Territory, in accordance with the Dred Scott decision,upporter of Senator Douglas--Mr. George E. Pugh, of Ohio Recently, U. S. Senator from that State; elected over Gov. Chase in 1853-4; succeeded by him in turn in 1859-60; since, a candidate for Lieut. Governor, under Vallandigham, in 1863.--in the Charleston Convention: Thank God that a bold and honest man [Mr. Yancey] has a
f Gen. Scott; and, lastly, Major Breckinridge of John Bell. In Kentucky, in the State canvass of 1859, Mr. Joshua F. Bell, American candidate for Governor, had tried hard to cut under his Democratic aron V. Brown, of Tennessee, Mr. Buchanan's first Postmaster-General, died, and was succeeded, in 1859, by Joseph Holt, of Kentucky, who stood by the Union. of Mr. Buchanan's Cabinet, was almost entirmber. Her leading politicians had shown the cloven foot a year too soon, by nominating, early in 1859, a State ticket pledged to favor the reopening of the African Slave-Trade, which was a well-under, Since, Confederate Postmaster-General. Reagan was elected to Congress from Eastern Texas in 1859, by 20,565 votes to 3,541 for Judge W. B. Ochiltree; but Houston for Governor had 4,183 majority Governorship Vote for Governor: Letcher, Dem., 77,112; Goggin, Am., 71,543. by the election of 1859, he, as a life-long champion of regular nominations and strict party discipline, had supported Do
of the conflicting pretensions of the Union and the Confederacy, took nobly and heartily the side of his whole country. But, even before the close of the called Session, a decided change in his attitude, if not in his conceptions, was manifest. On the 25th of March, replying to a plea for Peace, on the basis of No Coercion, by Senator J. C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, he thus thoroughly exposed the futility of the main pretext for Disunion: From the beginning of this Government down to 1859, Slavery was prohibited by Congress in some portion of the territories of the United States. But now, for the first time in the history of this Government, there is no foot of ground in Aerica where Slavery is prohibited by act of Congress. You, of the other side of this chamber, by the unanimous vote of every Republican in this body, and of every Republican in the House of Representatives, have organized all the territories of the United States on the principle of non-intervention, by Congr
unded, as the Presidential election more conclusively demonstrated — Bell and Everett carrying the State by a large plurality. Bell 66,058; Breckinridge 53,143; Douglas 25,651; Lincoln 1,364. Yet her Democratic Governor, Magoffin, Elected in 1859. though he forcibly protested See page 340. against the headlong impetuosity wherewith South Carolina persisted in dragging the South into Disunion — summoned her December 27, 1860. Legislature to meet in extra session, and, on its assemblin Government was rolling up a frightful debt, which Kentucky would not choose to help pay, etc., etc. Whereupon, he again urged the call of a Convention, with a view to State independence and self-protection. The Legislature had been chosen. in 1859, and had a Democratic majority in either House, but not a Disunion majority. It could not be induced to call a Convention, nor even to favor such neutrality as Magoffin proposed. Yet he presumed to issue May 20th. a Proclamation of Neutrality
enate concurred without a division. On the 16th, Zollicoffer advanced to Barboursville, Ky., capturing the camp of a regiment of Kentucky Unionists, who fled at his approach. The changed attitude and determined purpose of Kentucky encouraged the Federal Government to take some decided steps in defense of its own existence. Ex-Gov. Morehead, Charles S. Morehead, formerly a Whig representative in Congress from the Lexington district, afterward American Governor of the State from 1855 to 1859, was originally a Unionist of the Henry Clay school; but, having become largely interested in slaves and cotton-growing in Mississippi, was now and evermore a devotee of the Slave Power-hence a Disunionist. He bore an active and baleful part in the Peace Conference of February, 1861; and was thenceforth, though professing moderation, fully in the counsels of the Secessionists. a most inveterate traitor, was arrested at his residence near Louisville, and taken thence to Fort Lafayette, in New
llinois, the Douglas-Lincoln debate in. 301; the result, 302; the State pledges assistance to the Kentucky Unionists, 495. See Cairo and Alton. imports, value of, by 8th decennial census, 23. Indiana, Republicans beaten in, 301; Republicans a majority in, 326; the State pledges assistance to the Kentucky Unionists, 495. Indiana Territory, formation of, efforts to introduce Slavery, etc., 52-3. Indianapolis, Ind., President Lincoln at, 419. Indian Corn, 19; annual product of in 1859, 22. Indianola, Texas, Star of the West seized at, 413. Indians, enslavement of, 27; do. by the Puritans, 80; treatment of the Creeks and Cherokees by Georgia; President Adams protects them from the Georgian authorities, etc., 103; President Jackson favors their expulsion from Georgia, 104; their lands disposed of by lottery, 105; Georgia defies the Indian laws, and hangs Tassells, 106; treaties made with those of Kansas, 235. Ingersoll, Charles J., of Pa., reports in favor of Annexa