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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 265 265 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 46 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1859 AD or search for 1859 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
er. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachusetts, by his son, William H. Sumner: together with a genealogy of the Sumner Family, prepared by William B. Trask; Boston, 1854. New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April, 1854, and October, 1855. History of East Boston, by William H. Sumner; Boston, 1858; pp. 278-307 (with a drawing of the St. Edburg Church). History of Dorchester; Boston, 1859. The Sumners who remained in Dorchester and Milton during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were generally farmers, owning considerable estates in fee-simple, and blessed beyond the usual measure with large families of children. The Jacob or Jacobs family,—the maternal ancestors of Charles Sumner,—begins with Nicholas Jacob, who came to this country from Hingham, England, in 1633, settled in Watertown, and removed two years later to Hingham. For the genealogy of the Jacob fa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
been commended for his fidelity and success as a Christian teacher. He died, July 28, 1809. Sprague's Annals (Trinitarian and Congregational), Vol. II. pp. 42-48, containing an account by Josiah Quincy. Memorial of Abigail Stearns. Boston, 1859. To both Mr. Pemberton and Rev. Mr. French Major Sumner wrote with earnestness concerning the education of his son, laying much stress on his manners as well as his progress in knowledge. To the former he wrote, Aug. 26, 1787:— It rests years, gave pleasant reminiscences of her childhood, and of his residence in Mr. French's family in his boyhood. Memorial of Madam Abigail Stearns, with Funeral Discourses of Rev. Samuel Sewall, and of her son, Rev. Jonathan F. Stearns. Boston, 1859. Charles Pinckney Sumner entered Harvard College in 1792, and graduated in 1796. The members of his class who became most widely known were Dr. James Jackson, the eminent physician, who survived till 1867; Rev. Dr. Leonard Woods; and John Pic
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
be one more good fellow on that side, and one less on this. Life of Horace Mann, p. 91. They were afterwards to be fellow combatants in the causes of education and freedom. Among Sumner's papers was found a sketch, written during the last autumn of his life, of his friend's career. This tribute was intended for a municipal celebration in Wrentham, the birthplace of Horace Mann, but some circumstances prevented Sumner's attendance on the occasion. Mr. Mann was born in 1796, and died in 1859. He was Secretary of the Board of Education of Massachusetts, 1837-48; served four years in Congress as the successor of John Quincy Adams; and was President of Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, from 1852 till his death. Sumner passed a day with him at the College in 1855. Sumner's social range in Boston was, at this period, quite limited; but the few families he visited were those on whose fidelity and sympathy he could always count. He was on a familiar footing in the houses of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
nier,—whether as an eloquent lecturer or a vapid declaimer. Foelix, the editor of the Revue Étrangere, has told me that he was nothing better than a charlatan; and I must confess that what I heard this morning has not disturbed this opinion. I shall keep my mind open with regard to him, and hope to hear him repeatedly after I shall be better able to understand him. Jan. 17 (Wednesday). Called on the Ticknors and Walshes, Robert Walsh was born in Baltimore in 1784, and died in Paris in 1859. His career was miscellaneous, both as to residence and literary occupations. He studied in the Catholic colleges of Baltimore and Georgetown. Then he resided several years in Europe. Returning to this country, he studied law in Philadelphia, but did not follow the profession. In 1821, he founded, and for fifteen years edited, the National Gazette of that city. He published various papers on American politics, biography, and literature. In 1837 he went to Europe for a permanent residen
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ssed by some one,—Macaulay. I at once asked Lord Shelburne, who sat on my right, if that was T. B. M., just returned from India; and was told that it was. 1800-1859. Macaulay arrived from India in June, 1838, and was returned to Parliament from Edinburgh the same year, and served till 1847, when he lost a re-election. He was ministration of justice here; and concluded by proposing the health of the judges of England,—always honorable, impartial, and learned. Mr. Charles Phillips 1787-1859. He was born in Sligo; removed to London in 1821, where he was often counsel in criminal trials, and became, in 1846, Commissioner of the Insolvent Debtors' Court.n to dinner from Lord Denman, on account of a previous engagement. At my dinner, however, I met the old Earl Devon, William, eleventh Earl of Devon; he died in 1859, aged eighty-two.—the representative of the great Courtenay family, celebrated by Gibbon, The Decline and Fall, Chap. LXI.—Lord Plunkett, William Conyngham
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
tuation. I then travelled in the carriage of a friend,— Crowder, Richard Budden Crowder, 1795-1859. He became Recorder of Bristol in 1846, and a Judge of the Common Pleas in 1854. Sumner dined wied in Newcastle; Dr. Lardner seems a coxcomb and pertinacious fellow. Dionysius Lardner, 1793-1859. After his escapade in 1840, he came to the United States, and delivered lectures until 1845, wh an object for attention. What was my surprise when the Bishop of Durham, Edward Malthy, 1770-1859. He became Bishop of Durham in 1836. A note of the Bishop, written Dec. 22, 1838, refers to Sum; and Mr. Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, 1798-1869. He was a member of Parliament from 1826 to 1859, became Privy Councillor in 1835, and was Vice-president of the Board of Trade from 1835 to 1839, to 1847; Colonial Secretary from 1855 to 1858, and was raised to the peerage as Baron Taunton in 1859. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1852, was Lady Mary Matilda Georgiana, a daughter of