hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 265 265 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 46 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 31 31 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1859 AD or search for 1859 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
I never, said he, locked a door in my life, not when sleeping in the wildest place. It was not a large sum, but it bore too considerable a proportion to his limited income. He wrote plaintively to Dr. Howe, This little mishap has disconcerted me. I cannot afford the loss. My money does go as no other money seems to go. I verily believe, if I had a million it would slip through my open fingers. Similar mishaps befell him in later life, when he could better bear them. He had another in 1859 on the train between Washington and Philadelphia, and still another about the same time at a station in Boston. After delivering his address at Union College he visited Saratoga, where Dr. Howe joined him, and thence he made an excursion to Trenton Falls, Niagara, and Geneseo, at which last place he was a guest at the Wadsworths'. One who heard him at Union College wrote that he made an impression as an orator in whom it is hard to say whether the gifts of nature or the accomplishments of art
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
VI. pp. 568-573. See contrary doctrine as to the Northwestern territory, in his speech in the Senate Jan. 26, 1830, vol. III. p. 278. He shut his eyes to the historical fact that slavery has existed under all physical conditions; and that it was the duty of the national government, carrying out the policy of the Ordinance of 1787, not to weigh chances, but to exclude by positive law the possibility of its becoming an institution of new States. The territorial legislature of New Mexico in 1859 established slavery. Von Holst, vol. III. p. 500, note. Not content with assumptions and with votes against the prohibition, He voted, June 5, 1850, against applying the prohibition to Utah and New Mexico, when moved by Seward. Webster's Works, vol. v. pp. 382, 383. he undertook to belittle it by arts of speech, by offensive and disparaging epithets. In his first public statement of his new position, and in later speeches and appeals to the public, he made light of it as a mere abstra
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
an account of conversations at this and other dates where Sumner was present. Correspondence and Conversation of A. de Tocqueville with N. W. Senior from 1834 to 1859, vol. II. pp. 160-170; Conversations with M. Thiers, M. Guizot, etc, vol. II. pp. 114-139. the conversation was chiefly in French. A topic which interested me wicle showing the inconsistency of slavery and Christianity. There I met M. Passy; also M. Coquerel, 1795-1868. He heard Coquerel preach at this time or in 1858-1859. He introduced, October, 1871, the younger Coquerel to an audience in Boston. Works, vol. XIV. pp. 311-312. the eloquent preacher, and Mrs. Stowe. May 13. Ved at Erskine House with Lord and Lady Blantyre; met there Charles Howard. On reaching Glasgow drove to the Observatory to see Dr. Nichol; John P. Nichol (1804-1859), professor of astronomy. then back to the Queen's Hotel for the night. October 26. Took the early fast train at Glasgow, and reached Penrith at one o'clock, t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
Chapter 42: Europe again.—heroic remedies.—health restored. 1858-1859. Sumner arrived at Havre June 1; and after a night at Rouen, an old city which always fascinated him, he went on to Paris. Tscouraging, and he was almost in despair. Montpellier, a city of fifty thousand inhabitants in 1859, lies on the Gulf of Lyons, within easy distance from Cette on the west, and Nimes and Arles to tevennes. The way from the modern quarter, where the hotels are situated, to the Promenade was in 1859, and even twenty years later, by the market through narrow and devious ways; but a wide street wike, and trying to give me the pleasure of seeing you again. During his two visits to Paris in 1859, and while in London, Sumner indulged his passion for rare books (rare as to binding or edition),olution of the Republican State convention in 1858, and the degree of Doctor of Laws conferred in 1859 by Harvard College, the announcement being received in the church where the exercises were held,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. Sumner took his seat at the beginning of the session, Dec. 5, 1859 (the first session of the Thirty-sixth Congress), the Senate now occupying the new chamber in the extension of the Capitol, of which it had taken possession in the spring. Three years and a half had passed since he withdrew from active duty. During that period Buchanan had succeeded Pierce,—a change of administration, but not of policy; the Supreme Court had proclaimed, in the Dred Scott case, the sanctity of slavery in the national territory, beyond the power of the inhabitants as well as of Congress to exclude and prohibit it; Kansas, after alternating seasons of disturbance and peace, had been finally rescued by her Free State settlers, who, predominating largely in numbers and waiving their plan of abstention, now held the legislature, thus acquiring the sanction of legitimacy; the Lecompton con