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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 265 265 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 46 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 31 31 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1859 AD or search for 1859 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
University men between 1815 and 1870. Thomas Settle was Speaker of the House of Commons in 1858, 1859, and 1863; R. B. Gilliam in 1862; R. S. Donnell in 1864; and with the exception of twenty years te second, Thomas Watson Cooper, class of 1860, was killed; the third, Edward R. Outlaw, freshman 1859-60, was promoted from lieutenant. Hoke's North Carolina brigade was not less distinguished for b away to battle without finishing their work. There were eighty members of the Freshman class of 1859-60. But a single one (Titus W. Carr), remained to complete his studies and he was rendered unfitose, sufficiently accomplish the purposes of the trustees. At the close of the collegiate year 1859-60 (June 7th, 1860s), the whole number of students in our catalogue was 430. Of these, 245 were detailed to remain and keep order. What a sad contrast was this to the brilliant commencement of 1859, which was graced by the presence of the President of the United States and of his Secretary of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
Joseph Wheeler, now Member of Congress, who commanded a brigade and made a famous charge at Shiloh under the Direction of General Albert Sidney Johnston. The following article on the battle of Shiloh was written by General Joseph Wheeler, now representing the Eighth Alabama district in the House of Representatives. Although now sixty years of age, General Wheeler is one of the most active members of that body. He was born at Augusta, Ga., September 10, 1836, graduated at West Point in 1859, was lieutenant of cavalry and served in New Mexico; resigned in 1861; entered the Confederate army as lieutenant of artillery and was successively promoted to the command of a regiment, brigade, division, army corps; in 1862 he was assigned to command the army corps of cavalry of the western army, in which position he continued until the close of the war. By joint resolution of the Confederate Congress he was thanked for successful military operations, and received the thanks of the State o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
Company D, Clarke Cavalry. [from the Richmond Dispatch, April 19, 1896.] history and roster of this command, which fought gallantly. On the 19th day of April, 1861, just thirty-five years ago to-day, this company marched to Harper's Ferry. In the fall of 1859, many of the members of this organization belonged to the Clarke Guards which went to Harper's Ferry to take old John Brown, the forerunner of a large crusade, whose subsequent fate is known to all. Virginia had, on the 17th of April, 1861—two days before—passed the ordinance of secession, cast the die, crossed the Rubicon, and called upon her sons to keep her escutcheon untarnished. It was in response to this action that this company of as gallant and true spirits as ever went forth to battle, found itself at Harper's Ferry. Colonel J. E. B. Stuart took charge of it and all the cavalry, and Brigadier-General Thomas J. Jackson, was in command of all the forces there collected. In a glorious cause. The people of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
assiers of old, and used their pistols with the truth and nerve of expert marksmen. They so familiarized themselves with the country in which they operated, that they kept the enemy continuously speculating on their movements by checkmating them at every point in the game of war, and achieved such prestige by their strange ubiquity and stratagem that the name of their little legion became a watchword for danger and a signal for action with the Union troops. The Black Horse was organized in 1859, just two years before the war broke out, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The Lost Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
Colonel J. W., 166. Gurley House, Battle of, 102. Hampton Roads Conference, 33. Hampton, Strategy of General Wade, 278. Harrison, James P., 111 Hatcher's Run Battle of, 103. Helena, Ark., Attack on, July 4, 1863, 197. Hindman, General T C., placed under arrest, 69. Hobday, Captain, John, Gallantry of, 102; killed, 103. Holcombe Guards (Company I, 7th Virginia Infantry), Roll of the, 115. Hollins. Commodore George N., 88. Howitzers, The Richmond, at Harper's Ferry in 1859, 110 Howlett House, Battery at, 40. Hunton, General, Eppa, Brigade of, 83. Irby, Captain, Richard, 240. Ireland, Mission of Lieutenant J. L. Capston to, in 1863, 202. Jackson, General John K., 121. Jackson, General T. J., Pen picture of, 135. James City Cavalry, its organization and service, 353. James, Captain C. F., 83. James, Captain George S., 111. Jones' Farm, Battle of, 337. Jones. General Sam., 67. Johnson, General Bull, 81. Johnson, General Bradley T.,