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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 265 265 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 152 152 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 53 53 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 46 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 31 31 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 28 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16.. You can also browse the collection for 1859 AD or search for 1859 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
that time Mr. Brooks had the reputation of being the wealthiest man in New England. A letter written by Edward Everett while here is in possession of our Public Library, and one dated 15 June, 1857, was headed Medford. A ship built in the yard of Paul Curtis in 1843 was named the Edward Everett, and our town honored the distinguished statesman by naming one of her school buildings for him. It adds to the interest of local and general history to recall the fact that John Brown (before 1859) was a guest at the home of George L. Stearns, and received sympathy and encouragement from the host and his wife. If he could only have looked down the years to see Doctor Booker T. Washington December 17, 1905, Opera House and Mystic Church. that fine specimen of the despised race he really died for, entertained by our high-minded citizens and listened to by the largest audience ever gathered in Medford, how his soul would have been cheered; but John Brown only saw the promised land fro
ng occupied by George Nichols Company. Mr. Winneck continued postmaster until October 21, 1859, when he was succeeded by Alvah N. Cotton. Mr. Cotton was born in Rumney, N. H., but came to Medford when a young man to work on the Adams' farm, a large tract of land on Main street including the section later known as the Mystic Trotting Park. He later learned the ship carpentry trade and worked in Medford and at the Navy Yard, Charlestown. It is interesting to note that during the winter of 1859 there was a very severe snow storm and all traffic was at a standstill. No mail could be received or despatched by train for at least forty-eight hours. Mr. Cotton, on his snowshoes, took the mail to Boston, and returning brought out the Medford mail, carrying the pouches on his back. Mr. Cotton was very active in town affairs, serving several terms as selectman and assessor, and was a member of the Social Library Committee and Town Library Committee. He continued postmaster until April 22