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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 691 691 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 382 382 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 218 218 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 96 96 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 74 74 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 58 58 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 56 56 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 54 54 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1860 AD or search for 1860 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 10 document sections:

Chapter 29: Society in Boston. 1845-1860. A view of the society of Boston,—of the character and tendencies of its ruling class,—at the close of the first half of this century is essential to a just comprehension of the position of an agitator in such a community for moral and political reforms. The subject has only been toucarles Sumner's career. For a description of Boston in 1825, see ante, vol. i. p. 45. The characteristics of the people and society were much the same from 1820-1860. There are touches of Boston in 1860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 181860 in the Life, Letters, and Journals of Ticknor, vol. i. pp. 315, 316. The population of the city grew between 1845 and 1850 from 115,000 to 137,000, and five years later exceeded 160,000. Its territory was still confined to the peninsula,—Charlestown, Roxbury, and Dorchester being as yet suburban towns. Mansions surrounded by gardens had disappeared, and had given place to blocks. Fort Hill, long a residential quarter of rich people, had been aba<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
that he had not kept aloof from politics and reforms. Judge William Kent died Jan. 4, 1861. He was extremely conservative, and instinctively averse to popular agitations of any kind. He was a candidate on the Bell-Everett electoral ticket, in 1860. He was very refined and scholarly, and thoroughly sincere and high-minded. Notwithstanding their differences of opinion, he and Sumner were in most cordial personal sympathy. The fame of Sumner's Fourth of July oration was followed by varioSumner is a friendly one, dated Feb. 18, 1846. but their intimacy began when Mr. Adams undertook the editorship of the Whig, in 1846. For the next two years they appear to have been almost in daily conference. From that time until the winter of 1860– 1861 they were in very friendly relations of social and political intercourse. Sumner often dined at Mr. Adams's in Mt. Vernon Street, or took supper with him on Saturday or Sunday evenings, and also visited him at Quincy. Their association in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
ation. To Whittier, Jan. 5, 1848:— Thank God! at last we have a voice in the Senate. Hale John P. Hale of New Hampshire. has opened well. His short speeches have been proper premonitions of what is to come. I wish to see him discuss the war in its relations to slavery. Then I hope he will find occasion to open the whole subject of slavery, constitutionally, morally, politically, economically. This was an early and favorite idea with Sumner, finally carried out by himself in 1860. I wish to see Theodore Parker's letter Letter to the People of the United States touching Slavery. spoken in the Senate. That will diffuse it everywhere. To W. W. Story, January 14:— E——is stiffening and hardening into a stanch Old Whig, and talks of regular nominations, and voting the regular ticket. He seems to be inspired with an exalted idea of a combination to which I am entirely indifferent,— the united Whig party. Like Mr. Webster, he sees no star in the horizon b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
e President. (Seward's Life, vol. II p 80 ) The stress of Lincoln's argument was on the point that the Free Soilers were a party of one idea or principle, good enough in itself, but not broad enough to found a party on,—an objection urged with equal force against the Republicans, who twelve years later made him President. By a curious turn of politics, the men whom he came to Massachusetts to oppose—Sumner, Adams, Wilson, Andrew, Dana, and Burhngame—became his supporters in the election of 1860 and during his Presidency; while the foremost of the Whig leaders whom he came to assist were opponents of his election or of his Administration. Only at one place where Sumner spoke was the meeting disturbed,—at Lyceum Hall, Cambridge, in the midst of the associations of his youth; where the students, some Southern, and others reflecting the sentiments of the ruling class in Boston, interrupted him with hisses and coarse exclamations. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 127. He bore the ru
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
outh from the compact if the North deliberately disregarded the obligation to surrender fugitive slaves, using language not unlike that of the secession orators of 1860 and 1861. Curtis's Life of Webster, vol. II. pp. 517-520. Everett omitted this speech from his edition of Webster's Works. On the death of President Taylor, heantage, not claimed or foreseen by them, must always remain a matter of pure speculation. If the loyal people were in numbers and resources relatively stronger in 1860 than in 1850, on the other hand the pro-slavery party had during the intervening decade, under the administrations of Pierce and Buchanan, used diligently its oppoconcert action, corrupt officers of the army and navy, and dispose the materials of war in a way to give the insurrection the advantage at its beginning. The South was united and prepared in 1860 as it was not in 1850, and the government was at the outset in the means of resistance weaker at the later than at the earlier period.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
ers. Again, November 19— I do not see our future on the Presidential question. The recent declaration of Toombs seems ominous of a break-up, in which I should rejoice. I long to see men who really think alike on national politics acting together. The Whigs [in Massachusetts] are in despair. They confess that they are badly beaten. The coalition has been sustained and its candidate. Mr. Winthrop was not again a candidate for office. He acted in 1852 with the Whigs; in 1856, 1860, and 1864 he opposed the Republicans, and then withdrew from political controversy. His old Free Soil adversaries had a kindly feeling towards him notwithstanding the asperities of their contests with him. Sumner, after the early part of 1848, abstained from all reflections upon his course, publicly or privately. One or two slight allusions in private correspondence do not seem to require a qualification of the general statement. Wilson, in 1855, formally invited him to join in the anti-N
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
n in the last century, had passed most of their life in office,—as Berrien, Bell, Mr. Bell was one of the most distinguished of his type, and was a candidate in 1860 for the Presidency. The meagreness of his intellectual resources is described by a foreigner who had an opportunity to observe him closely. A. Gallenga's Episode 20, another resolution on the subject. The Legislature of Massachusetts supported him by a resolve passed April 12, 1852. He renewed the proposition in 1854 and 1860. He offered a resolution for cheap ocean postage, Dec. 7, 1868 (Works, vol. XIII. p. 1), and spoke briefly for it Feb. 12, 1869. He pressed the reform at the nenot help anybody to be President, it will never be done. He renewed this proposition (reported as inexpedient) at almost every session,—as in 1853, 1854, 1856, 1860, 1861, 1862, and 1863,—till finally, when he moved it in 1866, it prevailed substantially in the form he had given to it. The work was executed by commissioners ap<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
el was splendid, and the company elegant. His resemblance to his father is marked, 1810-1868. Reputed son of Napoleon I., and minister of foreign affairs, 1855-1860. his manners cordial and distinguished. I made haste to speak of M. Boileau, the French secretary at Washington, and to commend him warmly. The minister coolly sclock left, seeing the famous horse Touchstone as I drove out of the park. At two o'clock reached the Adelphi Hotel, Liverpool, where Mr. Richard Rathbone 1788-1860. Ante, vol. II. pp. 370, 378. had been waiting for me several hours; looked about Liverpool, and then went with him to his house in the neighborhood, where was onhom, however, proved untrustworthy in their votes on the English bill; and his breach with the Administration had an important relation to the national election of 1860. He was thus brought for a time into accidental association with the Republicans, some of whom were disposed to put the best construction on his change of front,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
window; while, as the professor observed in recalling the incident, his presence at the ball, with his brown skin and crisp hair, excited no surprise. Other interesting acquaintances which Sumner made at Montpellier were Jules Renouvier, 1804-1860; archeologist, and author of various notes on the historical monuments of France and Italy, and of a book on the art of engraving in Italy, Germany, the Pays Bas, and France, published in 1853; born and always having his home in Montpellier; a reppossessions. For this he paid forty pounds. Ante, vol. II. pp. 124, 131. Articles prepared by Sumner, and describing the album and the first edition of Thomson's Seasons which he had bought, may be found in the Boston Transcript, Jan. 9 and 12. 1860. He made similar purchases by order after his return; among them, copies of the Young Augustus and the Psyche, executed by his friend Story. His marbles became his sister Julia's; his bronzes were divided between Longfellow and Dr. Howe; his en
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. Sumner took his seat at the beginning of the session, Dec. 5, 1859 (the first session of the Thirty-sixth Congress), the Senate now occupying the new chamber in the extension of the Capitol, of which it had taken pal interest were disappearing, and the Republican party was uniting into one force the liberty-loving voters of the free States, with the probability of success in 1860; the pro-slavery party, with the co-operation of Buchanan and Douglas, had been conspiring to strengthen itself by the acquisition of Cuba; the threats of disunionsburg, at the age of forty-nine. On all these occasions he was received with every mark of popular affection and confidence. Sumner's activity in the canvass of 1860 was confined to Massachusetts, and he withstood solicitations to speak elsewhere. Letters declining to speak at meetings are found in Works, vol. v. pp. 190,