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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 691 691 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 382 382 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 218 218 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 96 96 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 74 74 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 68 68 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 58 58 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 56 56 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 54 54 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 49 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1860 AD or search for 1860 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to meet an engagement that night in the good old city of San Antonio, where also Colonel John Withers (the old Assistant Adjutant-General of the Confederacy) and his efficient committee had made all arrangements to give us a hearty reception and elegant entertainment. The committee met us at the depot, and escorted us to comfortable quarters at the Menger Hotel. General Fitzhugh Lee—as a young officer of the famous old Second Cavalry—had been accustomed to stop at this hotel in 1859-60, and he met in San Antonio many of his old friends. Despite the pouring rain, a fine audience assembled at the Casino, and among those on the platform were General C. C. Augur, General Thos. M. Vincent, and General Swiser, of the United States Army, while scattered through the audience were a number who wore the blue in the late war, but were willing to hear the story of Chancellorsville, told by a gallant, and true Confederate. General Lee had some of the same class of hearers everywhere
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
to meet an engagement that night in the good old city of San Antonio, where also Colonel John Withers (the old Assistant Adjutant-General of the Confederacy) and his efficient committee had made all arrangements to give us a hearty reception and elegant entertainment. The committee met us at the depot, and escorted us to comfortable quarters at the Menger Hotel. General Fitzhugh Lee—as a young officer of the famous old Second Cavalry—had been accustomed to stop at this hotel in 1859-60, and he met in San Antonio many of his old friends. Despite the pouring rain, a fine audience assembled at the Casino, and among those on the platform were General C. C. Augur, General Thos. M. Vincent, and General Swiser, of the United States Army, while scattered through the audience were a number who wore the blue in the late war, but were willing to hear the story of Chancellorsville, told by a gallant, and true Confederate. General Lee had some of the same class of hearers everywhere
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
thorities in Texas for some time and until his escape by flight into and through Mexico. He took up his residence in Ohio, was elected Lieutenant Governor, and became Governor of Ohio by the death of Governor Brough. Now to my story. Prior to 1860 Governor Anderson had been upon intimate terms both with General Scott and with General (then Colonel) Robert E. Lee. He was a delegate at large from the State of Ohio in the convention which nominated General Scott for the Presidency, and largely contributed to that nomination. In the fall of 1860 General Scott, the commander of the army of the United States, was at Washington city. Colonel Lee, in command of his regiment, was stationed in Texas—Governor Anderson living at San Antonio, Texas. General Twiggs was in command of the military department of Texas. On November 20th, 1860, Governor Anderson had made a speech at a secession meeting at the Alamo, opposing secession, and announcing his own purpose of adherence to the Union ca