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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

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exacted from a regimental thousand during a long and bloody war? The one regiment, in all the Union Armies, which sustained the greatest loss in battle, during the American Civil War, was the Fifth New Hampshire Infantry. This statement does not include the Heavy Artillery, which, owing to their larger form of organization, will be considered separately from the ordinary regiments of the line. It lost 295 men, killed or mortally wounded in action, during its four years of service, from 1861 to 1865. It served in the First Division, Second Corps. This division was commanded, successively, by Generals Richardson, Hancock, Caldwell, Barlow, and Miles; and any regiment that followed the fortunes of these men was sure to find plenty of bloody work cut out for it. The losses of the Fifth New Hampshire occurred entirely in aggressive, hard, stand — up fighting; none of it happened in routs or through blunders. Its loss includes eighteen officers killed, a number far in excess of the
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
active service; regiments, which performed garrison duty only, and were provided with comfortable quarters and good food. The greatest loss by disease occurred in some black regiments which were doing garrison duty, and were stationed in the same district from which they had been recruited and where they had lived all their lives. Then, again, certain regiments among the white troops suffered from disease, unaccountably, more than others. The Vermont Brigade, while encamped in Virginia, in 1861, lost scores of men by disease, while the regiments in adjoining camps were entirely exempt; and, yet, these Vermonters excelled in physique, cleanliness and intelligence. The most striking feature of the mortuary statistics is that the regiments which incurred the greatest loss in battle are the ones which suffered least from disease. While, throughout the whole army, the deaths from disease were double those from bullets, the hard fighting regiments seldom lost even a like number. One-
mportant one in view of the fact that it was the only one, out of two hundred or more brigades, which served through the war without being broken up, or reorganized. The same five regiments of the old Vermont Brigade which picketed the Potomac in 1861, marched together at the Grand Review in 1865. It was commanded successively by General Wm. F. Smith, formerly of the Third Vermont; General W. T. Brooks; Col. Henry Whiting, Second Vermont; and General Lewis A. Grant, formerly of the Fifth Vermothree New York regiments became so reduced in numbers that, at Gettysburg, they were consolidated into two companies each; the One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania had been consolidated into four companies. The brigade, which was organized in 1861, consisted originally of three New York regiments, which selected numbers corresponding to those of certain famous Irish regiments in the British Army. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania and Twenty eighth Massachusetts were added in the f
notes.--Organized at Elmira during the fall of 1861, from companies recruited in the counties of Ch Does not include the battalion organized in 1861. Total of killed, wounded and missing, 502ted to the other ten companies. In the fall of 1861, the regiment was in Stone's Division, which wather commands. Soon after its organization, in 1861, it was ordered to the Upper Potomac, and thencgton in October, 1861. It passed the winter of 1861-2 in winter-quarters near Alexandria, Va., and mp Lucas, Clermont County, during the summer of 1861, leaving the State on the 15th of September. I929 Of the original enrollment enlisted in 1861, there were 148 killed. Total of killed and seat of war in Virginia. During the winter of 1861-‘62 it was encamped at Annapolis Junction, Md.,rd. The regiment encamped during the winter of 1861-2, near Alexandria, and in March, under commander, was furnished entire by some one State. In 1861, General Berdan received authority from the War[15 more...]
pril, ‘61 6th Indiana Three-months' service, 1861.         3 3 3     April, ‘61 7th Indiana Three-months' service, 1861.   1 1   2 2 3     April, ‘61 8th Indiana Three-months' service, ril, ‘61 10th Indiana Three-months' service, 1861.   4 4   2 2 6     April, ‘61 11th Indiana Three-months' service, 1861.         1 1 1     Sept., ‘61 6th Indiana 9 116 125 2 140 142 267 TMay, ‘61 1st Michigan Three-months' service, 1861; engaged at First Bull Run. 3 3 6   3 3 9 Heinthese two-year regiments were organized early in 1861, the Army did not take the field until the sprigiments of volunteers from this State served in 1861, at the commencement of the war, but were enlisst referred to; that only those who enlisted in 1861 could reenlist, and that, owing to the depletioed a very large proportion of the volunteers of 1861, who were remaining in the field at the close o of the Michigan regiments went to the front in 1861 with Colonels who afterwards were numbered amon
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
ften for a third, time. Then, again, nearly all of the three years regiments that volunteered in 1861 reenlisted in January, 1864, for another three years term of service. There were 136,000 of thesas a basis for calculating the different percentages. The increase of the military population in 1861-62 was greater, proportionately, in the north-western States; and, hence, if the percentage of men furnished were to be figured on a census of 1861-62, their ratios would be decreased more than those of the Atlantic States. It should be understood, also, that the military population was proporti Totals 2,763,670 2,778,304 86,724 2,865,028 2,326,168 The quotas demanded of the States in 1861 and 1862 were computed on a basis of the entire population, instead of the military class, and, cental to the Civil War, the Navy played no secondary part. Losses in the United States Navy, 1861-65. Date. Vessel. Commander. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. 1861              
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
s for several battles. Estimates might be quoted, but such figures are not within the province of this work. Losses, by battles.--Union Armies. Date. Engagements. Killed. Wounded, including mortally w'd. Captured and Missing. Aggregate. 1861.             June 10 Big Bethel, Va 18 53 5 76 July 5 Carthage, Mo 13 31 -- 44 July 11 Rich Mountain, W. Va 12 49 -- 61 July 18 Blackburn's Ford, Va 19 38 26 83 July 21 First Bull Run, Va 470 1,071 1,793 3,334 August 10 Wilson's April 7 Farmville, Va 58 504 9 571 April 8 Spanish Fort, Ala 100 695 -- 795 April 9 Fort Blakely, Ala 113 516 -- 629 April 16 Cavalry engagements.Columbus; West Point, Ga 13 53 -- 66 Confederate losses in particular engagements. 1861.             July 21 First Bull Run, Va 387 1,582 13 1,982 Aug. 10 Wilson's Creek, Mo 265 800 30 1,095 Oct. 3 Greenbrier River, W. Va 6 33 13 52 Oct. 21 Ball's Bluff, Va 36 117 2 155 Nov. 7 Belmont, Mo 105 419 117 641 Dec. 1
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
eep in mind the sparse population of these States. Their military population in 1861 was: Alabama 99,967 Louisiana 83,456 Tennessee 159,353 Arkansas 65,231 Mie flag which waved over the first iron-clad. Losses in the Confederate Navy.--1861-65. Date. Vessel. Commander. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. 1862 vy, captures by privateers 573 Confederate States, military population of, in 1861. 552, 554 Connecticut regiments, list of, with loss in each 473 Conscriptilry 472 Nativity of soldiers in Union Army 62 Navy, casualties on vessels, 1861-65 538, 539 Navy, total of deaths in, 1861-65 537 Navy, deaths from diseas1861-65 537 Navy, deaths from disease in late war 537 Navy, number of enlistments in, 1861-65 533, 537 Navy, Confederate, list of actions, with losses 573 Navy, Confederate, number of vessels c1861-65 533, 537 Navy, Confederate, list of actions, with losses 573 Navy, Confederate, number of vessels captured 573 New Hampshire regiments, tabulation of, with loss in each 468 New Jersey nine-months' men, record of 483 New Jersey regiments, tabulation of, wit