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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

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mplete photographic record of soldier life: photographer and soldier, 1862, as the armies paused after McClellan's attempt on Richmond It is quite astonishing to discover that the immense collection of photographs reflecting the soldier life of 1861-65 so intimately and vividly had its rise in secret-service work. It is literally true, however, that Alexander Gardner's privileges of photographing at headquarters and within the Federal lines, at a thousand historic spots and moments, resultedeproducing the pictures direct on the printed page. But Gardner, first and last an artist, worked so patiently and indefatigably that, before the campaign was over, he had secured thousands of outdoor views which, with the many that Brady took in 1861 and part of 1862, and later in the path of Grant's final campaign from the Wilderness to Richmond, form the nucleus of the collection presented herewith. Needless to say, Gardner did not break faith with his employers or pass any of these photogr
h an overwhelming force at his back, well organized and equipped, better disciplined than were the Southern troops late in 1861, and their equal at least in experience, McClellan's splendid divisions, fully one hundred and forty thousand strong, wereter Mr. Pinkerton furnished for the Photographic history some reminiscences of Gardner's work: It was during the winter of 1861-1862 that Gardner became attached to the Secret Service Corps, then under my father. I was then a boy, ranging from sevenraph, with the two bashful-looking horses huddling together before the camera, shows Brady's outfit going to the front, in 1861. The lowest photograph demonstrates that even the busy photographer occasionally slept in his Camp with the army. The leotomac to the great depots of Aquia and Washington, and Harper's Weekly Photo-engraving was unknown in the days of 1861 to 1865, and it remained for the next generation to make possible the reproduction in book form of the many valuable photo
Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the new soldiers This regiment was organized at Bangor, Me., for three months service, and left thficers and 191 enlisted men killed and wounded, and 3 officers and 212 men by disease. Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont y disease. Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont y disease. Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont
of the war was 30,635—about one-eighth of what it was in 1910. The railroads of 1861 connected the Mississippi valley with the seaboard, it is true, but they had notand while the prices of almost all commodities rose far above the price-level of 1861, transportation rates, so far as the Government was concerned, remained uniform rvants. Marshalling the Federal volunteers Officer and sergeant in 1861 men of the sixth Vermont near Washington A hollow-square maneuver for the newnded, and 3 officers and 212 men by disease. Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: IVermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont Green mountain boys at drill, 1861: I and D companies of the sixth Vermont
n men wore anxious faces early in the spring of 1861. For months the newspapers had been filled wit the prompt muster Soldiers from the West in 1861—fourth Michigan infantry No less enthusiastie were strongly fortified. In the Sioux war of 1861, from one thousand to fifteen hundred persons wnton had not even been suggested in the fall of 1861. Simon Cameron, the venerable Pennsylvania polalong the Potomac that gorgeous early autumn of 1861. The beautiful wooded heights were crowned witt the best of coffee the commissaries served in 1861, but never did coffee taste better than in the ay in the camps about Washington in the fall of 1861, the men had time for a snooze or a social game have been due to Frank P. Blair, who, early in 1861, began organizing home guards. Blair subsequenate troops ready for the field in the summer of 1861. At Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861, Matt W. Ransom was on the firing-line early in 1861. Under his leadership as brigadier-general, No[16 more...]
ole body of students at her State University, 515 out of 530 who Confederate volunteers of 1861—officers of the nottaway grays After John Brown's attempt at Harper's Ferry, the people of theIrby, Sydnor. They took part in the first battle of Bull Run, and tasted powder. In the fall of 1861 First-Lieutenant Richard Irby resigned to take his seat in the General Assembly of Virginia, but e device on the tent, and the musicians are betrayed by the violin and bugle. This photograph of 1861 is indicative of the unanimity with which the young men of the South took up the profession of ar accompanying text is thoroughly illustrated by the photograph reproduced above. It was taken in 1861 by J. D. Edwards, a pioneer camera-man of New Orleans, within the Barbour sand-batteries, near thoreign and domestic trade had never been so prosperous as during the great war it was waging from 1861 to 1865? Remember, also, that by May, 1862, the armies of the Union were in permanent occupanc
ceived a degree of stiffening from such contact. Confederates of 1861: the clinch rifles on May 10th next day they joined a regiment destiserved, and 5,000 were recruits who joined from time to time between 1861 and 1864. Only 100 were conscripts. Of the total number treated ofor was the response of a militia field-officer in the late autumn of 1861, when challenged by a sentry who demanded: Who comes there? We kem e war, hence among the few that had swords and guns to start with in 1861. The Zouave Cadets, under command of Captain C. E. Chichester, formentionalities was of course the rule among Confederate volunteers of 1861. In the matter of meals especially many amusing instances arose. Tlan Zouaves in 1861 Ellis Green of the McClellan Zouaves in 1861. Member of the McClellan Zouaves in 1861. The host of ornately1861. The host of ornately uniformed and armed companies which sprang up at the outset of the war was ultimately merged into the gray monotone of the respective regimen
ter in a perfectly unfamiliar country just by the lay of the land, and by a kind of prescience almost amounting to instinct, and, at a glance, could estimate The change from theory to practice Wall-tents, such as appear in this photograph of 1861, were not seen for long in the Confederate army. At the beginning, no less than three wagons conveyed the impedimenta of a company of the Fifty-fifth Virginia—one having been provided by private subscription to transport the knapsacks! The rest y anyhow and sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. We are not in the confidence of the powers that be and know nothing of their Confederates in camp This photograph of Confederate troops in Camp was taken at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in 1861. The man writing the letter home on the box is Emil Vaquin, and Arthur Roman is the man completing the washing. Thomas Russel is gleaning the latest news from the paper, and Amos Russel is grinding coffee. The fifth man is Octave Babin. Names
to the front in these same uniforms and marched throughout the war. The American volunteer of 1861-65 never before had his like, or ever will again. He was of only the third generation from the R. But most of them had been members of the uniformed clubs in the exciting political campaign of 1861, and were fairly proficient in ordinary marching movements and handling torchsticks in semi-militme uniforms that they wore to the Mexican War. This and the hotly contested political campaign of 1861 served as the two great drill-masters of the Federal recruits at the outset of the war. A few of Most of these had marched as members of the uniformed clubs in the exciting political campaign of 1861, and were fairly proficient in ordinary movements and in handling torch-sticks instead of rifles.graduated from West Point in 1860 joined the Confederate army. The men of this class and that of 1861 became the drill-masters, and in many cases the famous leaders, of the Federal and Confederate ar
ral military service. Many of the fine regiments that took the field early in 1861 had famous drum-and-fife corps made up entirely of boys. In those days, too, ea1865. For this he was promoted to major-general of volunteers. In the class of 1861 with Ames at West Point was Judson Kilpatrick, who stood seventeenth, and who bened to the artillery, but after a short transfer to the infantry, in the fall of 1861, was made lieutenant-colonel of the Second New York Cavalry, rising to the rank e. Too young to enlist, and crowded out of the chance of entering West Point in 1861, he received the appointment of adjutant of the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin when bar little Ellsworth, who went out at the head of the Fire Zouaves in the spring of 1861, and was shot dead at Alexandria, after tearing down the Confederate flag. As aof West Point. The first of the boy generals was Adelbert Ames, of the class of 1861, colonel of the Twentieth Maine, closely followed by Judson Kilpatrick, colonel
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