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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
ess of manufacture. Colonel Rains, in the course of the Summer of 1861, established a refinery of saltpetre at or near Nashville, and to thl Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collected. By the close of 1861 the following arsenals and depots were at work, having been suppliedf local resources, both of labor and material. Thus by the close of 1861 a good deal had been done in the way of organization to produce the re pressing to the front in July and August, 1861. In the winter of 1861-1861, while McClellan was preparing his great army near Alexandria, 1861, while McClellan was preparing his great army near Alexandria, we resorted to the making of pikes for the infantry and lances for the cavalry; many thousands of the former were made at the various arsenals paying some attention to the succession of events. The winter of 1861-1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for on every hand—Bragg, at Pensacola, for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
ess of manufacture. Colonel Rains, in the course of the Summer of 1861, established a refinery of saltpetre at or near Nashville, and to thl Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collected. By the close of 1861 the following arsenals and depots were at work, having been suppliedf local resources, both of labor and material. Thus by the close of 1861 a good deal had been done in the way of organization to produce the re pressing to the front in July and August, 1861. In the winter of 1861-1861, while McClellan was preparing his great army near Alexandria, 1861, while McClellan was preparing his great army near Alexandria, we resorted to the making of pikes for the infantry and lances for the cavalry; many thousands of the former were made at the various arsenals paying some attention to the succession of events. The winter of 1861-1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for on every hand—Bragg, at Pensacola, for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
stinguished husband, Mrs. De Renne has had an edition of one hundred copies gotten up in the highest style of the book-maker's art, with beautiful engravings, fine binding, etc. contributions to A history of the Richmond how-Itzers. Pamphlet No. 2, is a worthy successor to No. 1, which we would advise all to secure by ordering at once from Carlton McCarthy & Co., Richmond, Va. We have not room to say more now. The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the States, 1861 to 1865, including A brief personal sketch and A narrative of his services in the war with Mexico, 1846-8. By Alfred Ro-man, formerly Colonel of the Eighteenth Louisiana Volunteers, afterwards Aide-de-Camp and Inspector-General on the Staff of General Beauregard. In two volumes, Volumes I. and II. New York: Harper & Brothers. 1884. Sold only by subscription. We have received our copy through Rev. 1. T. Wallace, Agent, Richmond, Va. We have not yet had time to give this book, as we p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
ve due weight to the opinions, suspicions and insinuations referred to, always referring to their source. We have now told all about the career of our great ship. We have gone with her through fire and smoke, death and destruction; and if the reader is so minded we will go back and learn something more of her. As related in the first chapter, she was built a short distance below the city of Memphis by Captain John T. Shirley. It seems that Captain Shirley organized in the early months of 1861 what he called a river brigade; but owing to the lack of facilities for operations he was compelled to disband his force. Not being content, however, to remain idle, he conceived the plan of building a couple of powerful gunboats for river service. The plan was adopted at Richmond, and the sum of $125,000 appropriated for the purpose. This sum was found totally inadequate, and in order to raise funds, which were supplied tardily by the Government, Captain Shirley was compelled to sell his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
ition of which are esteemed by us all not only as an honor, but as a genuine privilege. It is in the form of a shield, bearing upon its upper surface the word Survivor. Just below appear the historic letters C. S. A. On the right and left of the centre are delineated in realistic colors the flag of the Confederacy and the battle flag—symbols at once of national entity and of martial renown—both hallowed by associations the most patriotic and valorous. On the one hand is inscribed the date 1861, commemorating the commencement of the Confederate struggle for independence, and on the other the date 1865, perpetuating the year of the termination of the war between the States and the surrender of the Southern armies. Beneath the intersection of the staffs of the flags we have engraven the motto of the great seal of the Confederacy—Deo Vindice. With these words upon our lips, we confidently appeal from the arbitrament of the sword to the forum of conscience and that supreme tribunal whe<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
The Cruise of the Nashville. By Judge Theodore S. Garnett, Jr. [from facts furnished by Lieutenant W. C. Whittle.] In 1861 the Nashville, then used as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brig-rigged steamer, of about one thousand two hundred or one thousand four hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them toohard Taylor, Paymaster; James Hood, Chief Engineer; Assistant Murray, and two others, and the following Midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton,—— Thomas and —— McClintock. Early in the fall of 1861 she ran out of Charleston, touched at Bermuda for coal and soon arrived at Southampton, England, having ] captured and burned en route the American ship Harvey Birch. Here we remained until the latter part of January, 1862. About the 1st of Fe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Artillery at the Southern arsenals. (search)
rsenals. At the Fayetteville, N. C., arsenal, there was a fine battery of brass field pieces—four six-pounder guns, and two twelve-pounder howitzers, with forge and battery wagon complete. When the arsenal was surrendered to the State forces, this battery was turned over to the Ellis Light Artillery Company, of Raleigh, first commanded by Captain S. D. Ramseur, who, as Major-General commanding division, was killed at Cedar Creek, in the Valley, in October, 1864. The battery first saw service near Norfolk and on the Peninsula, and was subsequently known as Manly's Battery (Captain B. C. Manly), of Cabell's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. In time the company no doubt fell heir to twelve-pounder Napoleons, or to rifled pieces, but guns of that kind were not much known in the early days of 1861, and a company provided with a complete battery of guns of almost any calibre, with necessary appurtenances, was then thought to be very well equipped. Respectfully, Graham Daves
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
Military operations of General Beauregard. By Colonel Alfred Roman. A Review by Judge Charles Gayarre &. paper no. I. When the Confederacy of the United States of America, formed in 1787, was disrupted, in 1861, by the Secession of their Southern associates, and when an armed conflict between the two dissevered factions was anticipated, when these apprehensions were confirmed by the attack of the Southern Confederacy on Fort Sumter in the harbor of Charleston, it was evident to the most superficial observer that the contest, if earnestly entered into, and if prolonged to a considerable extent, would be very unequal between the parties. On one side—that of the Northern and Western States—there remained in all its strength a well-organized government with immense resources and with wheels accustomed to their functions—a regular army, a regular navy, manufactures of all sorts, accumulated wealth, a compact population, an unlimited credit, a commercial power felt and extended all<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of Mrs. Sarah K. Rowe, the soldier's friend. (search)
Death of Mrs. Sarah K. Rowe, the soldier's friend. Orangeburg, S. C., June 2, 1884. I feel warranted in informing you of the death of Mrs. Sarah K. Rowe, which occurred yesterday, the 1st of June, at her country home in this county. Mrs. Rowe was known for four and a-half years, 1861 to 1865, as the soldier's friend. I detract nothing from great women all over the South, Cornelias of heroic type, when I state that Mrs. Rowe was pre-eminently the soldier's friend. If this should meet the eye of Hood's Texans, of Polk's Tennesseeans, of Morgan's Kentuckians, or of Pickett's Virginians, any of whom passed on the S. C. R. R. during the war, her face beaming with benevolence, her arms loaded with food, will be remembered as one of the sunny events of a dark time. From the first note of war Mrs. Rowe gave all she had and could collect by wonderful energy to the soldiers. She had her organized squads. The gay, strong soldier to Virginia was fed and cheered on; the mangled
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's bummers, and some of their work. (search)
casion in our December (1883) number to protest against the use of this inaccurate and offensive term as the title of the publications of the War Records Office, and this elicited from our friend E. L. Wells, of Charleston, S. C., the following well put comment. Our friend's point is decidedly well taken: I notice that in criticising the title Rebellion affixed to certain State Papers by Washington officials, you speak of the term as one which is as inapplicable to the popular movement of 1861 as it would be if applied to that of 1776. I should think there was this difference: The uprising of 1776, however justifiable morally it may have been, was legally a rebellion of disloyal subjects against their government. The war of secession, on the contrary, was in pursuance of legal right, and was not against a government at all, but was waged between States or sectional populations; therefore, whatever else it may have been, it certainly was not a Rebellion. Yours, very respect
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