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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
ns who have survived the casualties of the bloody conflict (1861-1865) and the ravages of time. It is of great importanceAla.; Thos. P. Brewer, com.; med. offi., J. Gray Thomas, 1861, surgeon; members, 225; deaths, 14. Camp 12. Jackson, MM. Hastings, com.; med. offi., S. M. Thompson, A. M. M. D., 1861-2, ass't surgeon; members, 177; disabled, 7; indigent, 3; dk, La.; D. T. Merrick, corn.; med. offi., Dr. S. W. Turpin, 1861, captain; members, 22. Camp 111. Calvert, Texas; Capt. J. H. Dunnan, corn.; med. offi., Daniel Parker, 1861, asst. surgeon; members, 235; disabled, 6; indigent. 1; deaths, 2. Cexas; Maj. W. B. Sayers, com.; med. offi., Dr. J. C. Jones, 1861, asst. surgeon; members, 111; disabled 1; deaths, 3. Camaylor, Texas; Capt. W. Ross, corn.; med. offi., A. V. Doak, 1861, brig. surg.; members, 51; Home, Austin, Texas. Camp 166ond, Va.; R. N. Northen, corn.; med. offi., J. C. Hillsman, 1861, surgeon; members, 148; disabled, 4; indigent, 4; deaths, 6
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at the University of Virginia. (search)
o power, George Washington its executive. In 1860-1861, four of these very States that had formed the Unionhe 604 students at this institution in the spring of 1861; while there joined the first army of invasion, but same year. It gave to the Confederate service, from 1861 to 1865, more than 2,000 men of our University, of wken from catalogues of the two institutions for 1860-1861, Prof. Schele's Historical Catalogue of Students of oncerning him. General Hill, during the winter of 1861-1861, frequently expressed to me his unbounded confi1861, frequently expressed to me his unbounded confidence in Jackson's unbounded genius, and predicted that, if the war should last six years, and Jackson live sohat you should have done—it is the great Olympiad of 1861 to 1865, when you followed Joe Johnson and Robert Leer emphasis of pride. He joined it in the spring of 1861, sir. Yes, I was sure of it now. Her eyes had gaz Men, if her husband joined the Stonewall Brigade in 1861, and has been in the army ever since, I reckon he's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
killed at Port Republic, 1862. Blakemore, John R., killed at Second Manassas, 1862. Baker, John, died of disease, 1863. Craig, Alex. S., died of disease, 1861. Carroll, Frank, living at Zack, Va. Clemmer, John C., died prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1864. Clemmer, George L., died since the war. Carson, William, l, was assigned to the Fifth Virginia Infantry, and known thereafter as Company D. The following names were added to the roll of the company during the summer of 1861: Hansbarger, A. H., April 20, transferred to Company I. Beard, Samuel, May 23, killed at Kernstown, 1862. Lucas, Samuel, May 23, killed at Mine Run, 1863, and of these four, were violent deaths. Eighty-eight are still living, scattered from the far sunny South to the frozen North. There were in the company during 1861, seventy-two; of these (which are included in recapitulation above) sixteen were killed in battle, five died in Southern hospitals and six in Northern prisons, a t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
120 miles apart; and in assault or defence of these cities each section put forth its mightiest effort. The first army marched out from Washington for Richmond in 1861, and the Army of Northern Virginia routed it at Manassas. In 1862 it repelled the mighty army of invasion which came in sight of the spires of Richmond; defeates for hoping success. There are some who teach the children sprung from the loins of the Confederate soldier that it was folly to nurse the hope that the men of 1861 could maintain their undertaking. Their convictions of honor and duty left them no alternative; but were it otherwise, can it be matter of reproach that they bareers, and she could not maintain depots of supplies for any large force, at any distance from the sea. It was not thought possible, under the art of war as known in 1861, that steam vessels could maintain inland navigation for any distance, in the face of modern shore batteries, or that railroads could be effectually operated thro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
North Carolina, with characteristic conservatism, still clung to the federative union of States, which was conceived in the patriotic resolves of Mecklenburg, and ultimately established by the timely strategy and heroic valor of her volunteer troops at Kings Mountain and Guilford Courthouse. In 1789 she had awaited further assurance and guarranty that her rights as a sovereign State would be respected and protected before she would agree to enter into the more perfect union then formed. In 1861, she adhered to that union, and stood under the aegis of the old flag till those in whose custody the political revolution of the previous year had placed it, had already broken the compact, and attempted the subjugation of her sister States. The defiant answer of Governor Ellis to Lincoln's demand for North Carolina's quota of Federal soldiers, and his prompt call for volunteers to support our kindred and man our forts, went to the people on the wings of the wind. Telegrams, trains, sing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Lowndes Yancey, [from the Moutgomery, Ala., daily Advertiser, April 15, 1893.] (search)
erform manual labor himself. It was also in the year 1858, that Mr. Yancey unfolded in his Slaughter letter, the program of operations, which being subsequently pursued, precipitated the Cotton States into revolution in the early part of the year 1861. The legislatures in over half the slave States, were induced in 1858-9 to pass a solemn resolution to the effect, that the election of a Republican to the presidency would amount to a virtual dissolution of the Union, and would be a declaration President Buchanan, and were anxious to get possession of the forts and arsenals with their contents, and to organize a government prior to the induction of Mr. Lincoln into office. Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia seceded in the spring of 1861. Mr. Yancey never believed secession would be followed by war. Peaceable secession was the cuckoo song. It was the universal belief in the South that there would be no war. Here and there, Southern men were encountered, who predicted war, but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
The Shenandoah. [from the Atlanta Constitution, November, 1893.] Her exploits in the Pacific ocean, after the struggle of 1861-1861 had closed. Dr. F. J. McNulty, of 706 Huntington avenue, Boston, was one of the officers of the Confederate warship Shenandoah, which, on the 5th of November, 1865, flung to the breeze for the last time the Stars and Bars. Asked by the writer of this article to relate the story of the cruise of the Shenandoah and of the last wave of the Southern flag a f1861 had closed. Dr. F. J. McNulty, of 706 Huntington avenue, Boston, was one of the officers of the Confederate warship Shenandoah, which, on the 5th of November, 1865, flung to the breeze for the last time the Stars and Bars. Asked by the writer of this article to relate the story of the cruise of the Shenandoah and of the last wave of the Southern flag a few days since, the Doctor told this thrilling tale of the last terror of the seas, whose track was marked by a line of fire around the earth, from the tropics to the Arctic, while she gave the whaling marine of the United States its fatal blow: On the evening of the 8th day of October, 1864, said he, there met on Princesses dock, Liverpool, twenty-seven men. They were nearly unacquainted with each other, and knew nothing of their destination. All were officers of the Confederate navy,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
ion for a life of action, he leaped into the arena, Like Pallas, from the brain of Jove full armed. He succeeded to the National House of Representatives, resigned to accept the command of a Mississippi regiment in a foreign land, which added new honors and greener laurels to a Mexican soldier. He was afterward commissioned to the Senate, and later as chief of the War Department of the nation, and again to the Senate, where he was the peer of the oldest and proudest, where he remained until 1861, when, in a speech worthy of its author, he bade the Senate of the United States a final adieu, and in the following autumn was, with great unanimity, chosen President of the Confederate States. Thus your neighbor, countryman and fellow citizen, Jefferson Davis, became the chief of the Confederate cause, and for four weary years, with less than 600,000 men, battled against 3,000,000, and Vicksburg against like odds made a defence worthy of the cause and its principles-principles that underli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
but Dan reaped no benefit from this tardy justice. Emmett got into trouble about his song during the war. It was considered a rebel song, and a sapient Maine editor declared Dan to be a Secesh, and that he should be treated as one, although Dixie was written two years before the commencement of the war, and as originally written there was not a line that could be charged with any political hearing. The crowning popularity of this well-known ditty was secured in New Orleans in the spring of 1861, when Mrs John Wood played an engagement at the Varieties Theatre. Pocahontas, by John Brougham, was the attraction, and in the last scene a zouave march was introduced. Carlo Patti, brother of Adalina Patti, was the leader of the orchestra. At the rehearsal Carlo was at a loss as to what air to appropriate. Crowning triumph. Trying several, he finally hit upon Dixie. Tom McDonough shouted:That will do—the very thing; play it to-night. Mrs. John Wood, Mark Smith, Loffingwell, and J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The bloody angle. (search)
s a separate organization, and the few remaining members, not above two hundred in all, with the other fragments of Johnson's division, were incorporated into a single brigade, called Terry's brigade. The official designation of Stonewall brigade was not given to that body of men until after the death of its General, Paxton, at Chancellorsville, in May, 1863. Prior to that it had been known either by its number, or the name of its commander. When Stonewall Jackson was its commander in 1861, it was called the First Virginia brigade. After General Jackson was promoted to major-general in October, 1861, it was commanded by General Garnett, and was called Garnett's brigade. General Garnett, having incurred General Jackson's displeasure at Kernstown, was relieved of command, but afterwards fell at Gettysburg, leading his brigade in the charge of Pickett's division. After Garnett, General Winder commanded the brigade for about four months, until he was killed at Slaughter's moun
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