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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,245 1,245 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 666 666 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 260 260 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 197 197 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 190 190 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 93 93 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 88 88 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 82 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 79 79 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16.. You can also browse the collection for 1861 AD or search for 1861 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
titles as to deter modern readers from looking farther than the titles. In 1784 Dr. McClintock had the honor of preaching the first election sermon at the inaugural ceremonies of the governor of New Hampshire, a custom that was continued until 1861. He took for his text Jer. 18: 7-10. Although Bunker Hill Day is not generally observed outside of Massachusetts, yet the grave of Rev. Samuel McClintock, chaplain at the Battle of Bunker Hill, is always decorated at that time. You who are ; He found the Lord in his suffering brothers, And not in the clouds descending. Never rods to the wrongs redressing A worthier paladin. Shall he not hear the blessing, Good and faithful, enter in. Phillips Brooks was frequently at the house (1861-1863) of Mrs. A. K. Hathaway, Ashland street, to see a friend who boarded there. Some of our citizens remember that George L. Brown, the well-known artist, made his home (1863) in the old Bishop house on Salem street opposite the burying ground
. Patch in the West Medford postal service. Mr. Bixby kept a small store, groceries mainly, in a one-story building on High street, nearly opposite the Whitmore elm, as early as 1857 and while the Mystic Hall Seminary was in operation near by. Several old residents are explicit in their testimony in relation to the office being kept in that building, and of being served by Mr. Bixby on going there for their mail, the boxes or pigeon holes being on the right of the entrance door. The sign, painted on both sides, was fastened to that corner of the building and projected toward the street. This was in plain sight of the railway cars and the remembrance of seeing it many times in the winter of 1865-6 and the absence of mention of this location by Mr. Farnum has led to our extended inquiry relative thereto. The most definite statements point to about 1861 as Mr. Bixby's incumbency. His appointment was probably caused by the change of administration and made by President Lincoln.