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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 17 17 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for January, 1861 AD or search for January, 1861 AD in all documents.

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ckens, and the guns of Fort Barrancas bearing upon the channel were spiked. The Florida and Alabama troops occupied the Fort on the 12th and began mounting twenty-five 32-pounders, which threatened Fort Pickens until the Confederates abandoned the works, May 9, 1862. The spirit of resistance Here a Confederate camera has caught the spirit of the Southern soldiers at the outbreak of the war. These are Captain G. W. Dowson's Perote Guards manning the Perote Sand Batteries at Mobile, January, 1861. On the 11th of January, 1861, the ordinance of secession was passed by the Alabama convention at Montgomery. Its announcement was received with great excitement throughout the State. In Mobile the Cadets and the Independent Rifles marched to the public square and fired salvos of artillery. Alabama was early active in organizing volunteer militia and gave liberally of her sons to the Confederate cause throughout the war. On January 9th, at the request of the Governor of Florida, two
the seven which had already seceded from the Union. Virginia, the Old Dominion, the first born of the sisterhood of States, swung into the secession column but three days after the fall of Sumter; the next day, April 18th, she seized the arsenal at Harper's Ferry and on the 20th the great navy-yard at Norfolk. Two governments, each representing a different economic [A complete record of leading events and the various engagements, giving the troops involved and casualties between January, 1861, and August, 1862, appears on page 344.--The Editors.] The Southerner of the hour in 1861. Born in New Orleans on May 28, 1818, the Southern leader upon whom at first all eyes were turned, Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, was graduated from the U. S. Military Academy in 1838. Gallant and dashing, he won the brevets of Captain and Major in the war with Mexico and was wounded at Chapultepec. Early in 1861 he resigned from the army, and joined the Confederacy, being in command of
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
hich statistics, especially Confederate, are not available. Preliminary events from the secession of South to the bombardment of Fort Sumter. December, 1860. December 20, 1860: ordinance of secession adopted by South Carolina. January, 1861. January 9, 1861: U. S. Steamer Star of the West fired upon in Charleston harbor by South Carolina troops. January 9, 1861: Mississippi seceded. January 10, 1861: Florida seceded. January 11, 1861: Alabama seceded. Marshall House, Alexandria, Va. Fort Pickens. Fort Pickens, guarding the entrance to Pensacola Bay, 1861. Never was a perilous position more gallantly held than was Fort Pickens by Lieutenant A. J. Slemmer and his little garrison from January to May, 1861. A large force of Confederates were constantly menacing the fort. Slemmer discovered a plot to betray the Fort into the hands of a thousand of them on the night of April 11th. Attempts to seize the Fort by Confederates gathered i