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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 17 17 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for January, 1861 AD or search for January, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, X: a ride through Kansas (search)
a call was issued for a State Disunion Convention to consider the expediency of a separation between free and slave States, and Mr. Higginson's name led the signatures. This meeting was followed the next July by a call for a National Convention which was signed by Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, Higginson, and 6400 others. This proposed convention, however, was never held. Some of his reasons for belief in disunion, Mr. Higginson expressed in a letter to Harriet Prescott, January, 1861:— I cannot agree with you and Mr. Seward about the Union, because I think that the Free States without the Slave will instantly command an influence, moral and material, which is denied us now. You know that even now the credit of Massachusetts Stocks is far higher in Europe than [that] of United States Stocks, and this symbolizes everything. A rough swearing mate of a vessel once told me he never dared own himself an American abroad, because he was so reproached in every port wi
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XI: John Brown and the call to arms (search)
and the Antis. Wendell Phillips spoke once a month on Sunday at Music Hall and it was necessary to guard the building to prevent the meetings from being broken up by riotous young men. Mr. Higginson described this new duty in a letter, dated January, 1861, referring to the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society:— This week has been given over to mobs; I have been one of the captains of the fifties spoken of in Scripture; that is we had sixty men armed and organized, undon his feet. If he knew that at his next word of truth, the whole solar system would be annihilated, his voice, in saying it, would not tremble. Apropos of the duty of guarding Phillips, the Worcester clergyman again wrote to his mother, January, 1861:— I spent yesterday in Boston for a wonder, not having been away on Sunday for a long time. They sent for me to come down because it was feared that there would be trouble at the Music Hall as Wendell Phillips was to speak . . . and th