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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 22 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 17 17 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for January, 1861 AD or search for January, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
mter and by Governor Pickens on the islands surrounding it. War seemed inevitable, and the whole State, as one man, was firmly resolved to meet it. The legislature had passed a bill on December 17th providing for the organization of ten regiments for the defense of the State, and the convention had ordered the formation of a regiment for six months service, to be embodied at once, the governor to appoint the field officers. This last was Gregg's First regiment, which was organized in January, 1861 , and on duty on Sullivan's and Morris islands by the 1st of February following. The governor appointed Maxcy Gregg, of Columbia, colonel; Col. A. H. Gladden, who had been an officer of the Palmetto regiment in the Mexican war, lieutenantcol-onel; and D. H. Hamilton, the late marshal of the United States court in South Carolina, major. On March 6, 1861 , the adjutant-general of the State reported to Gen. M. L. Bonham, whom the governor had commissioned major-general, to command the div
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ate and Confederate service. Governor Pickens wrote to the secretary of war at Richmond about the time of the Federal expedition to North Carolina, and the capture of the batteries at Hatteras inlet, urgently requesting that Gregg's First regiment might be sent him from Virginia, as he expected an attack to be made at some point on the coast. In this letter he begged that 40,000 pounds of cannon powder be forwarded from Norfolk at once. The governor had bought in December, 1860, and January, 1861 , 300,000 pounds from Hazard's mills in Connecticut, for the use of the State, but he had loaned 25,000 pounds to the governor of North Carolina, 5,000 pounds to the governor of Florida, and a large amount to the governor of Tennessee. Of what remained he needed 40,000 pounds to supply about 100 guns on the coast below Charleston. The governor estimated the troops in the forts and on the islands around Charleston at 1,800 men, all well drilled, and a reserve force in the city of 3,000
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
Scotland, who settled in Kershaw county about 1830, and married a granddaughter of Abraham Belton, a pioneer of Camden and a soldier of the revolution. He was a student at the South Carolina college, read law, and was admitted to practice in January, 1861, but at once gave himself to the military service of his State. In April, 1861, he became captain of Company E, Second South Carolina infantry, under Col. J. B. Kershaw. With this command he was in the first battle of Manassas, and was stru his kinsmen, Commodore William B. Shubrick and Capt. Edward Shubrick. In 1842 he abandoned this service at sea, and became an official of the Planters and Mechanics bank at Charleston, of which he was cashier at the period of secession. In January, 1861, he presented to Gen. David F. Jamison, secretary of war for the State, a design he had prepared for an ironclad battery, and it being approved, he immediately began the erection of an armored battery of two guns on Cummings point, known as t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
st business at that bar. He volunteered in January, 1861, in the Edisto Rifles at Orangeburg, was elton, when the call to arms was sounded in January, 1861, left his plantation interests on Port Roy, with the second honors of his class. In January, 1861, Mr. Haskell enlisted as a private in Comphis native State. He enlisted as early as January, 1861, in Company E, Eighth South Carolina infanHe practiced two years at Columbia, and in January, 1861, offered his services to the State. As asthat school he went into active service in January, 1861, and was on duty on Morris island when theife as a clerk when the State seceded. In January, 1861, he became second sergeant of the Charlestton, where he was reared and educated. In January, 1861, he entered the military service of the St, and for four years orderly-sergeant. In January, 1861, he was offered by C. G. Memminger, State at Emory college, Georgia. He enlisted in January, 1861, as first lieutenant of Company D, Second [6 more...]