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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America.. You can also browse the collection for March, 1861 AD or search for March, 1861 AD in all documents.

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n views at that time were those officially expressed later on by Mr. Seward, that the war would be over in ninety days. He retained these views, he tells us, until after the battle of Shiloh. Lincoln was not to come into office until the spring of 1861. The South was confident and defiant, and in the North there were prominent men and newspapers declaring that the government had no legal right to coerce the South. It was unsafe for Mr. Lincoln, when he went to be sworn into office in March 1861, to travel as President-elect; he had to be smuggled into Washington. When he took on the 4th of March his oath of office to maintain the Union, eleven States had gone out of it. On the 11th of April, Fort Sumter in Charleston harbour was fired upon, and a few days after was captured. Then the President issued a call for 75,000 men. There was not a State in the North of a million inhabitants, says Grant, that would not have furnished the entire number faster than arms could have been sup