hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 3 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 17, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for March 4th, 1861 AD or search for March 4th, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

The Daily Dispatch: January 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], A speech on Lincoln's message from a Newly-elected U. S. Senator. (search)
ountry by surprise, and no one of the citizens more than myself. I had fondly hoped and been anxious that the President of the United States would so conduct himself in his high office of Chief Magistrate that I could lend him my support. I have been driven, with thousands of others, into opposition to the policy contained in that proclamation, for reasons which must commend themselves to every reflecting man sincerely desirous of terminating this rebellion. Mr. Lincoln, on the 4th of March, 1861, on the east portico of this Capitol, took a vow, which he said was registered in Heaven, to support the Constitution of the United States. In his inaugural address, delivered on that occasion he said he had no lawful authority or inclination to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. In his proclamation of the 22d of September last he assumes that he has power to forever free "all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State