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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 11: the Montgomery Convention.--treason of General Twiggs.--Lincoln and Buchanan at the Capital. (search)
amilton, at the entrance to New York Bay; and never was a curse by bell, book, and candle, more sincerely uttered, than were those that fell from the compressed lips of these betrayed soldiers. These troops were the first who left Texas. They came from posts on the line of the Rio Point Isabel, Texas, in 1861. Grande, and embarked in the Daniel Webster at Point Isabel, a place of much note in the history of the war with Mexico. 1846-1848. They arrived at Fort Hamilton on the 30th of March, 1861. At five o'clock on the evening of the 16th, February, 1861. the little band of National troops in San Antonio marched sullenly out of the city, to the tune of The red, white, and Blue, and encamped at San Pedro February, Springs, two miles from the Plaza, there to remain until the arrival of Colonel Waite. They were followed by a crowd of sorrowing citizens. The tears of strong men were mingled with those of delicate women, when they saw the old flag disappear; and sullen gloom
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
onsisting of only a single company of artillery, under Captain Vogdes, ninety in number, were taken from Fortress Monroe, whose garrison was already too weak to be safe against an attack by Virginians, while at the same time General Fort McRee and Confederate Battery opposite Fort Pickens. Scott held three hundred troops in readiness for the purpose, at Fort Hamilton, in New York harbor, where they were not needed. Statement of Lieutenant-General Scott, dated at Washington City, March 30, 1861, and published in the National Intelligencer, October 21, 1862. On the 24th of January, the National war-steamer Brooklyn left Fortress Monroe for Fort Pickens, with Captain Vogdes and ten artillerymen, and provisions and military stores. It was also determined to employ three or four small steamers, then in the Coast-Survey service, for the same purpose, under the command of Captain J. H. Ward of the Navy, Statement of General Scott, above cited. who was an early martyr in the c