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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 10 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for April, 1861 AD or search for April, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
ds called the Army of Northern Virginia—the noblest army (I hesitate not calmly to affirm, after the lapse of years) that ever marched under any banner or fought for any cause in all the tide of time. But I do not propose, in this volume, to attempt even a sketch of the military exploits of this noble army of heroes. I revert rather to another and far different scene from the one I have sketched. Over a year has rolled by, and that fair-haired, rosy-cheeked boy, mother's darling, of April, 1861—now a bronzed veteran of the Army of Northern Virginia, who has followed the stars and bars on many a victorious field—returns to his boyhood's home. But he comes not back with light, elastic step and erect carriage as when he marched forth so gayly at his country's call. He is borne on a litter—he has been shot through the lungs, his life-tide is ebbing away, and he has come home to die. On that memorable 27th day of June, 1862, at Cold Harbor, when Stonewall Jackson issued his crisp
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
are made in the room; and there is also a dressing-room, where they keep their knapsacks, etc. The rooms are kept in order by the convalescents, who serve under her direction, and learn to love their respective duties. The sick are supplied with everything that can make them comfortable. Morning and evening services are held, consisting of reading the Scriptures, singing and prayer; and she is her own chaplain, except when she can procure a substitute. Thus has she been engaged since April, 1861, with uninterrupted health and unparalleled success, making soldiers and mothers and wives glad, and heaven rejoice over repenting sinners. Here is another sketch of a soldiers' friend who labored in some of our largest hospitals. She is a character, writes a soldier, a Napoleon of her department; with the firmness and courage of Andrew, she possesses all the energy and independence of Stonewall Jackson. The officials hate her; the soldiers adore her. The former name her The
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
E. B. Stuart, the flower of cavaliers, who said to President Davis, who stood at his dying bedside: If it were God's will, I should like to live longer and serve my country. If I must die, I should like to see my wife first; but if it is His will that I die now, I am ready and willing to go if God and my country think that I have fulfilled my destiny and done my duty. Colonel Wm. Johnson Pegram—Willie Pegram, the boy artillerist, we used to call him—left the University of Virginia in April, 1861, at the age of nineteen, and enlisted as a private in an artillery company, but, by superb courage and splendid skill, rose to be colonel of artillery and the idol of the whole army, when he fell on that ill-fated day at Five Forks which caused the breaking of Lee's lines and the fall of the Confederacy. In an every way admirable sketch of him, written by his adjutant and intimate friend, Captain W. Gordon McCabe, it is said of him, while in winter-quarters near Fredericksburg in 1862-
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
ms as I can for your Appendix to Christ in the camp, from the army of Tennessee. I was pastor of the Methodist Church in Winchester, Tennessee, in 1860-61 The First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, was organized in that place in April, 1861. Colonel Peter Turner, now the senior Supreme Judge of Tennessee, was in command. It was the first regiment from Tennessee to go to Virginia early in May. Many of the soldiers of that gallant command were from the counties where I had preachhe Tennessee had been surrendered. Dr. McFerrin preached in Greensboroa, North Carolina, that morning to the Army of Tennessee a valedictory sermon for the soldiers. I preached my first sermon to the soldiers, I think, at Winchester, late in April, 1861, and my last at Rock Hill, South Carolina, Sunday night, April 23, 1865. I spent a couple of weeks with Chaplain Whitten with his kindred in Newberry, South Carolina. Came alone on horseback to Macon, Georgia, where I was paroled, May 23,