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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 10 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April, 1861 AD or search for April, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
e mention these facts to show how gentlemen in the highest official positions, and possessing the best means of information upon which to form an accurate judgment, were mistaken in their estimate of the crisis precipitated upon the country in April, 1861, and the duration of its existence. It was not until after the first battle of Bull Run in July, that the Washington authorities began fully to comprehend the real magnitude of affairs, and to adopt measures in correspondence with them. Wey service, and at the same time man the navy with seamen, for whom we obtained no credit or allowance whatever; and this injustice continued until July 4th, 1864, when an act passed Congress allowing the men in the navy, who had enlisted since April, 1861, to be counted into the contingent of a State to which they belonged, and in which they had enlisted. By this act of tardy justice Massachusetts was credited with twenty-two thousand three hundred and sixty men (22,360). See Volume I., pag
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
lis, Paul Wing, Isaiah Fish. The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was David C. Freeman; from June, 1863, and during 1864 and 1865, David C. Percival. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 11th of May; It is proper to state that a public meeting was held in April in the Town Hall, notice of which had been given by posters and the ringing of church-bells, an account of which we find in the Sandwich Republican of April, 1861. Several gentlemen made speeches, among whom was Major S. B. Phinny, editor of the Barnstable patriot, a democratic paper. He was frequently interrupted by the spontaneous and hearty applause of the audience whenever any allusion was made to our Flag, the Constitution, and the Union. On motion of Theodore Kern, Esq., it was voted that the sum of $20 be immediately raised by subscription, as a bounty for each man who would enlist in the campaign. Six hundred and twenty dollars were pled
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
asurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Noah Chace: in 1865, Oliver P. Simmons. 1861. A day or two after the President issued his first call for troops, in April, 1861, a meeting of the citizens of Dighton was held, and initiatory steps were taken to form a military company; and a petition was signed, requesting the selectmen 25: in 1862, $29,771.67; in 1863, $36,476.10; in 1864, $34,000.00; in 1865, $20,000.00. Total amount in four years, $127,510.02. The ladies of Fall River in April, 1861, formed a Soldiers' Aid Society, which held its first meeting for work on the 1st of May. For six weeks they met daily, and worked from morning until evening. eral ladies did their work for the society at their own dwellings. The society retained its organization, and continued its Christian and patriotic labors from April, 1861, to July 28, 1865; during the whole of which time Mrs. Richard Borden was president, whose ceaseless devotion to the interests of soldiers merits their warmest
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
— Ordered, That the sum of fifteen thousand dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated for the benefit of the families of those of our fellowciti-zens who have so nobly and promptly responded, or may hereafter respond, to the call of their country; and that the same be expended under the direction of a Joint Special Committee. Salem had three companies of volunteer militia, which entered the military service under the first call of the President for troops for three months service in April, 1861; namely, companies A and H in the Fifth Regiment, and Company I in the Eighth Regiment. On the 22d of April the city council passed the following— Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on Relief for Families, appointed at the last meeting of the city council, be authorized to designate and procure some suitable place as a barrack and parade-ground in our harbor, or elsewhere within the limits of the city, for such volunteer companies as have been or may be enlisted in this city f
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $353.54; in 1862, $2,429.42; in 1863, $2,943.15; in 1864, $2,700.00; in 1865, $1,450.00. Total amount, $9,876.11. The ladies of Pepperell were constant in their endeavors to do good for the soldiers at the front, and forwarded during the war to the Sanitary and Christian Commissions articles valued at thirty-two hundred and fifty dollars. The Rev. Charles Babbidge went out with the Sixth Regiment of three-months men in April 1861, as chaplain, and with the Twenty-Sixth three-years regiment. With the exception of two months he was on duty from the beginning to the end of the war. Rev. Edward P. Smith, of Pepperell, was a valued and active member of the Christian Commission. Reading Incorporated May 29, 1644. Population in 1860, 2,662; in 1865, 2,436. Valuation in 1860, $1,269,570; in 1865, $1,293,056. The selectmen in 1861 were James S. Campbell, J. Brooks Leathe, Milo Parker; in 1862, James S. Campbell,