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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 10 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April, 1861 AD or search for April, 1861 AD in all documents.

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its resources to the uses of war against its sister States, or to ally itself with secession in order to resist the threatening armed coercion. The crossing of troops into Virginia with hostile purpose is the act of war, said Robert E. Lee in April, 1861, and that act occurred before the secession ordinance was voted on by the people. The original ordinance of secession passed April 17, 1861, to take effect on the fourth Thursday in May, 1861, if ratified by the vote of the people, was oppoheretofore referred to, the object of Virginia and the Confederate government being to hold the western counties, while it was the Federal design to facilitate the disparting of Virginia. Keeping these military operations which were occurring in April and May, 1861, before us, we will consider the action taken at the same time among the people of that section which led finally to the institution of the State of West Virginia. The citizens of Virginia inhabiting the western counties were unc
nawha county, the company of Kanawha Riflemen, Capt. George S. Patton, was organized at the time of the John Brown raid, and entered the Confederate service in April, 1861. It included some twenty lawyers of the Charleston bar, among them, serving as privates, William A. Quarrier, T. B. Swann, Thomas L. Broun, Isaac N. Smith, S. rs. In Pocahontas county, the scene of many conflicts, some of which are not recorded in history, two infantry companies and one of cavalry were organized in April, 1861. One of the infantry companies, organized at Huntersville, included nearly 100 men, commanded at first by Capt. D. A. Stoner and later by Capt. J. W. Matthews, ansbrough's battalion to form the Twenty-fifth regiment, the Huntersville company becoming Company I. The other infantry company was organized at Green Bank in April, 1861, with 106 men, under Capt. James C. Arbogast, and was ordered west on the Parkersburg turnpike, and later stationed at Laurel Hill, as Company G of the Thirty-f