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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 10 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April, 1861 AD or search for April, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Chapter 5: The First Kanawha Valley campaign April to July, 1861. We now turn to a consideration of the Kanawha valley campaign of the early part of 1861, as that was a portion of Scott's plan of invasion of Virginia that was intrusted to McClellan; deferring until later the consideration of military operations along the Potomac, which, in sequence of time, would at this point demand attention. McClellan's original intention was to begin the invasion of Virginia from Ohio by way of the Kanawha valley along the great stage road to Staunton, having the same objective as Patterson from Pennsylvania up the Shenandoah valley; but events treated of in the preceding chapter diverted him to the lines of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, and led to the Rich Mountain campaign and the handing over of operations on the Kanawha line to a subordinate with whom he was in constant telegraphic communication. Previous to the building of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, the most important
Chapter 6: The First Shenandoah Valley campaign April to July, 1861. The United States arsenal and armory at Harper's Ferry, at the junction of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, was the coveted object that first led to military operations in the Shenandoah valley in 1861. Ex-Governor Wise, early in April, urged the authorities at Richmond, by letter, to press forward on three points, the first, Harper's Ferry, to cut off. the West, to form camp for Baltimore and point of attack on Washington from the west. In Richmond, on the night of April 16th, when it became evident that the Virginia convention would pass an ordinance of secession, Wise called together at the Exchange hotel a number of officers of the armed and equipped companies of the Virginia militia: Turner and Richard Ashby of Fauquier, O. R. Funsten of Clarke, all captains of cavalry companies; Capt. John D. Imboden, of the Staunton artillery; Capt. John A. Harman of Staunton; Nat Tyler, editor of the Rich
was prominent in Virginia councils during the momentous month of April, 1861, and on April 21st, having been appointed brigadier-general in tated in 1846. He remained at the institute as a professor until April, 1861, when he marched to Richmond in command of the corps of cadets. of the army. He remained in that position, at Washington, until April, 1861. On entering the Confederate service he was commissioned major,enant Stuart received a commission as captain from Washington in April, 1861, but he had decided to go with Virginia, and tendered her his seer's Ferry, to which point he went with his company in 1859. In April, 1861, he was again at Harper's Ferry, and was assigned to the Fourth his was one of the best companies mustered into the service. In April, 1861, Captain Walker and his company were ordered to report for duty e returned to Petersburg and was again engaged in business until April, 1861. In May, 1853, he was unanimously elected colonel of the Thirty