hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for April 29th, 1861 AD or search for April 29th, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

houler, I, 99. and Capt. F. T. Newhall says the steamer was instantly taken without firing a shot. See letter in Schouler, I, 103. But Greeley, in his American Conflict, goes far beyond this. After describing the burnt bridges and the lack of cars, he proceeds: But General Butler was not a man to be stopped by such impediments. Seizing the spacious and commodious ferry steamer Maryland, he embarked his men thereon. Greeley, I, 468, 469. So the New York Commercial Advertiser (April 29, 1861) spoke of the Maryland, which had been seized by General Butler. (Rebellion Record, I, 49.) Nobody took the pains to point out that the steamer had on the preceding day (April 19) been retained for that precise purpose by the president of the road, Mr. Felton, who had also provided it with coal and a pilot for Annapolis; Mr. S. M. Felton's statement will be found in full in Schouler, I, 101. Mr. Felton himself was a Massachusetts man and a Harvard graduate. so that it was simply awai