hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 4: death of Ellsworth.--capture of Alexandria, Va.--Potomac flotilla. (search)
R. B. Lowry. This, though not a very important achievement, gave indication of the feelings of the Navy, and how ready was the service to put down secession on the first opportunity offered. The death of Ellsworth created a great impression upon the minds of the naval officers and sailors from its brutal accompaniments, and showed them forcibly that treason would only carry in its train rapine and murder, with all the horrors attending vindicative warfare. As early as the last of May, 1861, the Confederates had completed three batteries on the Potomac, at Aquia Creek--railroad terminus — and others above and about the landing. The guns mounted in these works were mostly rifles, giving the Confederates an advantage over our vessels, which mounted only smooth-bore thirty-two-pounders. As the Government had already, on several occasions, shown great decision, it is remarkable that it did not at once proceed to put down this work of the Confederates in fortifying the command
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
trasted. Sherman's legions. Dupont's eminence as a Commander. attempts to despoil Dupont of his honors. Dupont's high commendation of his officers. General Sherman's headquarters securely established at Hilton Head. Tatnall escapes. Colonel Gilmore's reconnoissance. results of the loss of the Norfolk Navy Yard. Owing to the increase of the Confederate forces in the States of Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri, it became necessary to fit out armed vessels on the Western rivers. In May, 1861, Commander John Rodgers, U. S. N., was directed to report to the War Department, which in the early stages of the conflict practically assumed the control of the Western flotilla, although the vessels were under command of naval officers. Commander Rodgers proceeded at once to the West and purchased a number of river steamers, which were fitted and armed as gunboats; and this was the commencement of the Mississippi Squadron which afterwards performed such efficient service for the Union