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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 17. James H. Morgan (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He joined the Colorado in May, 1861; volunteered for the United States steamer Mississippi; was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans; was on board the Ironsides at Charleston. Joined the Richmond in October, 1863. 18. John Smith, second, (Captain of Top,) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Varuna w
rred which induce me to renew the subject in greater detail than was then deemed necessary. In calling to your attention the action of these governments, I shall refer to the documents appended to President Lincoln's messages, and to their own correspondence, as disclosing the true nature of their policy, and the motives which guided it. To this course no exception can be taken, inasmuch as our attention has been invited to those sources of information by their official publication. In May, 1861, the Government of her Britannic Majesty informed our enemies that it had not allowed any other than an immediate position on the part of the Southern States, and assured them that the sympathies of this country (Great Britain) were rather with the North than with the South. On the first day of June, 1861, the British government interdicted the use of its ports to armed ships and privateers, both of the United States and the so-called confederate States, with their prizes. The Secretar
nfer with their fellow-citizens, who shall then be present, as to the best means necessary to be adopted for putting in full and successful operation the civil machinery of our State, and securing our restoration to all our former rights and position in the Union. Resolved, That we earnestly desire and request the Hon. J. K. Sebastian to take his seat in the United States Senate as one of the Senators from the State of Arkansas. Resolved, That the State of Arkansas now is, and was in May, 1861, when the ordinance of secession was passed, a member of the United States of America. Resolved,That we recognize as valid no power or authority which attempts to sever the political connection existing between any State and the United States. The question being upon the adoption of the resolutions, the Rev. J. A. Butler was called out and advocated their adoption in a speech of an hour's duration, replete with patriotic sentiments, humor, sarcasm, and sound and convincing logic. Af