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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

urpose is the act of war, said Robert E. Lee in April, 1861, and that act occurred before the secession ordinance was voted on by the people. The original ordinance of secession passed April 17, 1861, to take effect on the fourth Thursday in May, 1861, if ratified by the vote of the people, was opposed strenuously in the convention by the delegates from some of the northwestern counties, and notwithstanding its passage, many of those who had resented it returned to their counties to organizeeferred to, the object of Virginia and the Confederate government being to hold the western counties, while it was the Federal design to facilitate the disparting of Virginia. Keeping these military operations which were occurring in April and May, 1861, before us, we will consider the action taken at the same time among the people of that section which led finally to the institution of the State of West Virginia. The citizens of Virginia inhabiting the western counties were uncompromisingl
, and Daniel T. Kellar third lieutenant; and the other the Hampshire Guards, John B. Sherrard captain, D. W. Entler first lieutenant, and Felix D. Heiskell second lieutenant. The first-named company had about 96 men, and the last about 80. In May, 1861, both of these companies were ordered by the governor of Virginia to report to Col. T. J. Jackson, then commanding at Harper's Ferry. Soon afterward the Thirteenth Virginia regiment of infantry was organized, with A. P. Hill as colonel, and th captain of a cavalry company; Friend C. Cox, who became a staff officer with Gen. W. H. F. Lee; and Robert McEldowney, a member of the Shriver Grays, of Wheeling. The Shriver Grays, organized at Wheeling, with about 80 men, was organized in May, 1861, with Daniel Shriver, captain; John W. Mitchell, first lieutenant; John B. Leadley, second lieutenant; Pryor Boyd, junior second lieutenant. The company left Wheeling on the 21st or 22d of May, 1861, and went to Harper's Ferry, reporting to Co
ty. His career as a jurist and public official during the ante-war period was prominent and distinguished. He was twice elected to the Virginia house of delegates, served twice as second auditor of the State, and superintendent of the State library fund; held the office of lieutenant-governor one term, and in 1860 was elected judge of the Nineteenth judicial circuit of the State. He left the bench early in 1861 to enlist in the Virginia forces as a private, and was rapidly promoted. In May, 1861, Major Boykin, writing from Grafton, recommended that General Lee appoint Judge Jackson to military command at Parkersburg, as a gentleman of great personal popularity, not only with his own party, but with those opposed to him politically, and devoted to the interests of Virginia, to the last extremity. With the rank of lieutenant-colonel, Virginia volunteers, he reported for duty to Colonel Porterfield, in Randolph county, in June. Out of the companies collected at Huttonsville, two re