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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ndefatigable and honored president of the Washington Artillery Association, will also give voice in answer to the toasts proposed to be drunk in honor of their respective charges. Now, Mr. Chairman, I desire to express my thanks for the attention that has been bestowed upon my unworthy effort and to apologize for the time I have consumed in my weak endeavor to place before you a partial record of the Washington Artillery from its organization to the date of its departure for Virginia in May, 1861. Imperfect as it is, the labor bestowed upon the compilation has been a labor of love as well as of duty. The history is one of which any command, in any land, might well be proud. The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. address of Captain J. A. Chalaron. Soldiers,—In eloquent and feeling words the Father of the Battalion has just related its birth, its growth, its history—the departure of its first quota for the front in Virginia. We are fortunate veterans, and membe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
hat he will do justice to his theme, there are none here who know as I do of his action and gallantry, his devotion and bravery, signalized upon every field, who will fail to extend to him a hearty reception. The distinguished president of the Veterans' Association, Colonel Eshleman, and Colonel Bayne, the indefatigable and honored president of the Washington Artillery Association, will also give voice in answer to the toasts proposed to be drunk in honor of their respective charges. Now, Mr. Chairman, I desire to express my thanks for the attention that has been bestowed upon my unworthy effort and to apologize for the time I have consumed in my weak endeavor to place before you a partial record of the Washington Artillery from its organization to the date of its departure for Virginia in May, 1861. Imperfect as it is, the labor bestowed upon the compilation has been a labor of love as well as of duty. The history is one of which any command, in any land, might well be proud.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
, and if the occasion ever arises Lee will win this place in the estimation of the whole world. The General then went into a detailed sketch of Lee's services, and a statement of his ability as an engineer, and his capacity not only to plan campaigns, but also to command large armies in the field, and concluded by saying: I tell you, sir, that Robert E. Lee is the greatest soldier now living, and if he ever gets the opportunity, he will prove himself the greatest captain of history. In May, 1861, this gentleman and another, obtained a passport from General Scott to go to Richmond, to see if they could do anything to promote pacification. In the course of the interview, General Scott spoke in the highest terms of Lee as a soldier and a man, stated that he had rejected the supreme command of the United States Army, and expressed his confidence that Lee would do everything in his power to avert war, and would, if a conflict came, conduct it on the highest principles of Christian civ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
ng of the prisoners, and where Nature had furnished every possible requisite for salubrity. Losses of the Army of the Potomac: In his oration before the veterans of the Army of the Potomac, at their last reunion, Major Maginnis gave an estimate of losses of this army, which we think can be shown to be greatly below the real figures, but we give his figures as a most eloquent tribute to the prowess of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the skill of our great commander: He said: From May, 1861, to March, 1864, the losses of the Army of the Potomac were, in killed, 15,220; wounded, 65,850; captured, 31,378; in all, 112,448. From May 1, 1864, to April 9, 1865, killed, 12,500; wounded, 69,500; captured or missing, 28,000; aggregate, 110,000. From the beginning to the close of the war, killed, 27,720; wounded, 155,652; captured or missing, 59,378. A grand aggregate of 242,750. Added those who died of gunshot wounds, the number of men who lost their lives in action in the Army of