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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
nd character most highly esteemed by the President of the Confederacy, it seems safe to say that no educational institution contributed more to the Confederacy in proportion to relative strength than did the University of North Carolina. Not that this institution was more disloyal to the Federal Government than others in the South; not that her alumni were more pre-eminently given over to the doctrine of secession than were the alumni of other institutions; but when North Carolina saw, in May, 1861, that she had the choice between two evils and that she could not remain neutral in the pending struggle, she made the choice that was the most natural and reasonable. She chose the side of the State, or of local government, against the growing tendency toward centralization then given a new impetus by the Federal authorities. The alumni of her University responded gladly to her call to duty. They were faithful to the earlier teachings of their Alma Mater. They risked name and fame, lif
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Muster Roll of the Holcombe Guards. (search)
Muster Roll of the Holcombe Guards. The following is furnished by Mr. W. A. Parrott, of McMullen, Greene county: The Holcombe Guards, afterwards Company I, Seventh Virginia Regiment (General Kemper's original regiment), Kemper's Brigade, Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, was organized May, 1861, at White Hall, Albemarle county, Va., and mustered into service June 3, 1861, with the following officers and men: J. J. Winn, Captain, dead; J. W. Rodes, first lieutenant, dead; B. G. Brown, second lieutenant, dead; W. B. Maupin, third lieutenant; T. J. Golding, orderly sergeant; J. E. Wyant, second sergeant, dead; D. O. Etherton, third sergeant, dead; W. A. Brown, fourth sergeant, killed at Williamsburg; C. B. Brown, fifth sergeant; W. P. Walters, first corporal, killed at Williamsburg; B. Fretwell, second corporal, died 1861; J. P. Jones, third corporal, dead; W. N. Parrott, fourth corporal; J. B. Ambroselli, killed at Gettysburg; F. A. Bowen, kille
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
risoners, and nearly every one of them wears a scar. One hundred and eighteen sleep their last sleep; they have fought their last battle, and no sound can awake them to glory again. A company that had 170 men, fought fifty-seven pitched battles, had eighty-three men killed, thirty-five to die after the war, and fifty-two, by no fault of theirs, left wondering how it was possible that they escaped, surely deserve the credit of having tried to do their duty. On the fourth Thursday in May, 1861, the ordinance of secession was ratified by the people of Virginia by 130,000 majority. It did not wait for that, but had been in the field for more than a month previous to said action. For four long years 500,000 of us, all told, on land and sea, fought more than three millions of soldiers, and absolutely wore ourselves out whipping them. We fought the good fight; we kept the faith—are still keeping it—and when the problems, anxieties, and disappointments that absorbed our energies sh