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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
inia. Appointed Virginia. 8. Brigadier-General, April 21, 1861. Commanding Virginia forces at Norfolk, Va., April-May, 1861; afterwards colonel (temporary rank) of engineers in charge of defences of Eastern North Carolina, 1862. Isaac R. Tr951. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 11. Colonel (Virginia army) and Commissary-General of Virginia, April and May, 1861; Major, P. A. C. S., and Chief Commissary Trans-Mississippi Department, 1864. Henry C. Wayne. 954. Born Georgia. sissippi, and Western Tennessee. Edmunds B. Holloway. 1185. Born Kentucky. Appointed Kentucky. 19. Colonel, May, 1861. Commanding First Missouri Infantry, Missouri State Guard. Killed May 6, 1861, in a skirmish at Independence, Mo. cis J. Thomas. 1211. Born Virginia. Appointed Maryland. 6. Colonel, May 17, 1861. Commanding Maryland Volunteers (May and June, 1861); July, 1861, acting chief of ordnance on General J. E. Johnston's staff. Killed July 21, 1861, at Bull Ru
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
that he would reply to it in writing as soon as possible. But no answer ever came. For nearly a year after the war began, although many prisoners were captured and released on parole, on both sides, the Federal authorities refused to enter into any arrangement for the exchange of prisoners, taking the absurd position that they would not treat with rebels in any way which would recognize them as belligerents. The English government had already recognized us as belligerents as early as May, 1861. As the Earl of Derby tersely said in the House of Lords: The Northern States could not claim the rights of belligerents for themselves, and, on the other hand, deal with other parties, not as belligerents, but as rebels. After awhile the pressure on the Federal authorities by friends of the prisoners was so great that they were induced to agree to a cartel for the exchange of prisoners on the very basis offered by the Confederates in the beginning. These negotiations were commence