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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 20: commencement of civil War. (search)
y and others in Virginia, drive out the Confederate forces there, and advance on Harper's Ferry. He visited Indianapolis on the 24th of May, and reviewed the brigade of Indianians who were at Camp Morton, under Brigadier-General T. A. Morris. In a brief speech at the Bates House, he assured the assembled thousands that Indiana troops would be called upon to follow him and win distinction. Indiana's Roll of honor: by David Stevenson, Librarian of Indiana, page 89. two days afterward, May 26, 1861. he issued an address to the Union George B. McClellan. citizens of Western Virginia, in which he praised their courage and patriotism, and warned them that the few factious rebels in their midst, who had lately attempted to deprive them of their rights at the polls, were seeking to inaugurate a reign of terror, and thus force them to yield to the schemes and submit to the yoke of the treacherous conspiracy dignified by the name of the Southern Confederacy. he assured them that all
the other to occupy Parkersburg. On the same day, General McClellan issued the following proclamation and address:-- Headquarters Department of the Ohio, May 26, 1861. To the Union Men of Western Virginia. Virginians:--The General Government has long enough endured the machinations of a few factious rebels in your midst. you remain true to the Stars and Stripes. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General U. S. A., Commanding Dep't. Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, May 26, 1861. soldiers:--You are ordered to cross the frontier and enter upon the soil of Virginia. Your mission is to restore peace and confidence, to protect the ma support of such civil authorities of the State as are faithful to the Constitution and laws of the United States. The proclamation issued by me under date of May 26, 1861, will be strictly maintained. Your houses, families, property, and all your rights will be religiously respected: we are enemies to none but armed rebels and
Doc. 34.-proclamation of Gen. McClellan. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Grafton, (Va.,) June 23, 1861. To the Inhabitants of Western Virginia: The army of this department, headed by Virginia troops, is rapidly occupying all Western Virginia. This is done in cooperation with and in support of such civil authorities of the State as are faithful to the Constitution and laws of the United States. The proclamation issued by me, under date of May 26th, 1861, will be strictly maintained. Your houses, families, property, and all your rights will be religiously respected. We are enemies to none but armed rebels, and those voluntarily giving them aid. All officers of this army will be held responsible for the most prompt and vigorous action in repressing disorder and punishing aggression by those under their command. To my great regret I find that the enemies of the United States continue to carry on a system of hostilities prohibited by the laws of war among belligerent
Nor dare collect our revenue; For gentlemen, from earliest date Were never useful to the State. Thanks to my forts, and guns, And arsenals, (yours, once!) I can now speak my mind, As Ancient Abe shall find! Hats off! hats off! Ye slaves, of curs begotten, Hats off to great King Cotton! God's ministers, we fight for you: Aid us, ye aid the Gospel too. For you, beast-people, (clear the track!) Still bear our saddles on your back! We'll ride you all your lives; Your daughters, too, and wives, Shall serve us in our need, And teach our girls to read! Hats off! hats off! Ye slaves, of curs begotten, Hats off to great King Cotton! Your musket, chaplain--(mind my toes!) The smoke is incense in my nose! On them, Confederates, great and small! Down with the Union--death to all! From my brave ancestry, These rights descend to me, And all true Southern men, World without end. Amen. Hats off! hats off! Ye slaves, of curs begotten, Hats off to great King Cotton! May 26, 1861. --Vanity Fair.
haste, with the ladies of my family conversing in the room, and without consulting any one. They were at once despatched by telegraph to Wheeling and Parkersburg, there to be printed. Proclamation.headquarters, Department of the Ohio, May 26, 1861. To the Union Men of Westem Virginia: Virginians: The general government has long enough endured the machinations of a few factious rebels in your midst. Armed traitors have in vain endeavored to deter you from expressing your loyalty at tlong boasted by the Old Dominion are still preserved in Western Virginia, and that you remain true to the stars and stripes. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. U. S. A., commanading Dept. Address.headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, May 26, 1861. soldiers: You are ordered to cross the frontier and enter upon the soil of Virginia. Your mission is to restore peace and confidence, to protect the majesty of the law, and to rescue our brethren from the grasp of armed traitors. You a
e rear of the position taken by the Confederate troops under General Ewell. The brigades of Trimble and Hayes were drawn up near this house, at some distance from the brigade of Early. After the battle the whole of Jackson's army was drawn up on the slopes near it. The fugitives: followers of Pope's retreat Virginia Negroes following Pope's soldiers in their retreat from Cedar Mountain. From the beginning of the war Negroes had been a subject of debate. Even before Bull Run, on May 26, 1861, General B. F. Butler had declared that all fugitive slaves would be considered as contraband of war. Congress, however, decided in August that all slaves confiscated should be held subject to the decision of the United States courts. In April of 1862, General Hunter, at Hilton Head, South Carolina, declared that all slaves in his military department were forever free, but a week later Lincoln annulled the proclamation. Hunter, however, raised a storm by organizing a regiment of fugitiv
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
rs Philadelphia, Baltimore, Powhatan, and Mount Vernon armed by U. S. Government, and cruising on the Potomac. May 13, 1861. Proclamation of neutrality issued by Queen Victoria, in which the subjects of Great Britain were forbidden to endeavor to break a blockade lawfully and effectually established. May 18-19, 1861. Shots exchanged between U. S. S. Freeborn and Monticello and the Confed. battery at Sewell's Point, Va. U. S. S. Harriet Lane arrives off Charleston. May 26, 1861. U. S. S. Brooklyn commenced the blockade of the Mississippi River. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minnesota begins real blockade of Charleston. Blockade of Savannah initiated by U. S. gunboat Union. May 31, 1861. U. S. S. Freeborn, Anacostia, Pawnee, and Resolute attacked Confed. batteries at Aquia Creek, Va. June, 1861. June 27, 1861. Engagement between U. S. gunboats Freeborn and Reliance and C
oseph Eggleston Johnston Johnston commanded the First and the Last Great Aggressive Movements of Confederate Armies—Bull Run and Bentonville. and attempted to prevent Sherman's advance through the Carolinas. Johnston's capitulation was agreed upon near Durham's Station, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. He was United States commissioner of railroads from 1885 to 1889. He died in Washington, March 21, 1891. Army of the Peninsula The Department of the Peninsula was established on May 26, 1861, and Colonel John B. Magruder was put in command. The troops therein were organized into divisions in November, and denominated the Army of the Peninsula. In December, the aggregate present was about sixteen thousand. On April 12, 1862, it was merged in the Army of Northern Virginia—constituting, under Major-General Magruder, the right wing of that army. Major-General John Bankhead Magruder (U. S.M. A. 1830) was born at Winchester, Virginia, August 15, 1810, and served in the Sem<
Doc. 199.-Gen. McClellan's proclamation to the people of Western Virginia. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, May 26, 1861. To the Union Men of Western Virginia: Virginians:--The General Government has long endured the machinations of a few factious rebels in your midst. Armed traitors have in vain endeavored to deter you from expressing your loyalty at the polls; having failed in this infamous attempt to deprive you of the exercise of your dearest rights, they now see the Old Dominion, are still preserved in Western Virginia, and that you remain true to the Stars and Stripes. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding Address to the volunteer army. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, May 26, 1861. soldiers:--You are ordered to cross the frontier and enter upon the soil of Virginia. Your mission is to restore peace and confidence, to protect the majesty of the law, and to rescue our brethren from the grasp of armed traitors. You ar
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 218.-N. Y. Seventh Regiment papers. (search)
Doc. 218.-N. Y. Seventh Regiment papers. Headquarters Department, Washington, May 26th, 1861 Colonel Lefferts, Commanding N. Y. Seventh Regiment: Sir: Your regiment has accomplished all that was intended by it in crossing over to Arlington to take possession of the heights, and have labored on the intrenchments manfully, also. The security of this city renders it imperative you should resume your encampment on this side; and you will this afternoon march over accordingly, and hold your regiment here ready to turn out when called upon. Very respectfully, J. H. K. Mansfield, Brig.-Gen., and Commanding. Washington, D. C., April 29, 1861, Headquarters, commanders of companies, 8TH Regiment, Massachusetts Vol. Militia. To Col. Lefferts, officers, and members, New York Seventh Regiment: At a meeting of this regiment, held this morning, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted: Whereas, The trials and fortunes of war have brought us into close
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