hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 78 78 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June, 1861 AD or search for June, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
ries of this place into shops for casting guns and making small arms. The Confederates considered that it would be a difficult matter for the Union forces to blockade the different mouths of the Mississippi, the bayous and sounds, and flattered themselves that New Orleans would become the rendezvous for all the blockade runners that had early in the war commenced to swarm upon the coast like bees about the honey flowers. But they were disappointed in their expectations, for as early as June, 1861, Commodore McKean sent the Powhatan, Lieut. D. D. Porter, to close up the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi, and Commander U. S. Sloop of war Brooklyn, off Pensacola. Charles Poor, in the Brooklyn, to blockade Pass à l'outre. It was through the latter channel that the Sumter, Captain Semmes, escaped to sea, while the Brooklyn was off in chase of a strange sail, and she was thus enabled to commence her career of havoc on American commerce. This drew the attention of the Navy De