Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for June 17th, 1861 AD or search for June 17th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21, 1861 Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 26-30, 1861 Carnifex Ferry (Va.)Sept. 10, 1861 Lexington (Mo.)Sept. 20, 1861 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21, 1861 Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 26-30, 1861 Carnifex Ferry (Va.)Sept. 10, 1861 Lexington (Mo.)Sept. 20, 1861
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Booneville, battle of. (search)
Booneville, battle of. Governor Jackson, of Missouri, a Confederate sympathizer, had abandoned Jefferson City, which was immediately occupied by General Lyon. Before the Confederate forces could concentrate about Booneville, 50) miles above Jefferson City, Lyon moved upon Booneville, and, with 2,000 men, defeated Marmaduke, who offered little resistance, in twenty minutes, on June 17, 1861. This compelled the Confederate detachments to move to the southern border of the State.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper's Ferry, (search)
ut 15,000 men in June, 1861. Just at this moment commenced Wallace's dash on Romney, which frightened Johnston, and he abandoned Harper's Ferry, and moved up the valley to Winchester. Before leaving he destroyed the great bridge of the Baltimore and Ohio Railway at the Ferry with fire and gunpowder. It was 1.000 feet long. Then he spiked the heavy guns that could not be taken away, and encamped a few miles up the valley. Patterson, who was at Hagerstown, Md., pushed on, and on June 16 and 17 about 9,000 of his troops crossed the Potomac by fording it at Williamsport. These were led by Brig.-Gen. George Cadwalader, at the lead of five companies of cavalry. At that moment Patterson received orders by telegraph from General Scott, at Washington, to send to him all the regulars, horse and foot, under his (Patterson's) command, and a Rhode Island regiment. Patterson was embarrassed, and requested the general to leave the regulars with him, for he expected to hold the position and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
egislature as indirect secession and unconstitutional......May 14, 1861 Governor Jackson calls for 50,000 militia, for the purpose of repelling invasion, and for the protection of the lives, liberty, and property of citizens of the State ......June 12, 1861 Governor Jackson, with the State troops, proceeds to Booneville, leaving the capital to fall into the hands of Lyon......June 15, 1861 General Lyon defeats the State troops under Colonel Marmaduke in battle at Booneville......June 17, 1861 An indecisive battle is fought at Carthage between State troops under General Jackson and Federals under General Sigel......July 5, 1861 State convention makes Robert Wilson president in place of Sterling Price, made major-general in the Confederate army......July 22, 1861 State convention declares the office of governor, of lieutenant-governor, and of members of legislature vacant, and elects Hamilton R. Gamble as provisional governor......July 31, 1861 Thomas C. Reynolds, e