Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 12th, 1861 AD or search for July 12th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 84.-battle of Rich Mountain, Va. Gen. McClellan's official report. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Rich Mountain, Va., 9 a.m., July 12, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend: We are in possession of all the enemy's works up to a point in the right of Beverly. I have taken all his guns, a very large amount of wagons, tents, &c.--everything he had — a large number of prisoners, many of whom were wounded, and several officers prisoners. They lost many killed. We have lost, in all, perhaps twenty killed and fifty wounded, of whom all but two or three were in the column under Rosecrans, which turned the position. The mass of the enemy escaped through the woods, entirely disorganized. Among the prisoners is Dr. Taylor, formerly of the army. Col. Pegram was in command. Colonel Rosecrans's column left camp yesterday morning, and marched some eight miles through the mountains, reaching the turnpike some two or three miles in rear of the enemy, defeating an advanced post,
Doc. 85.-McClellan's Second report. Beverly, July 12th, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C,: The success of to-day is all that I could desire. We captured six brass cannons, of which one is rifled, all the enemy's camp equipage and transportation, even to his cups. The number of tents will probably reach two hundred, and more than sixty wagons. Their killed and wounded will amount to fully one hundred and fifty, with one hundred prisoners, and more coming in constantly. I know already of ten officers killed and prisoners. Their retreat is complete. I occupied Beverly by a rapid march. Garnett abandoned his camp early in the morning, leaving much of his equipage. He came within a few miles of Beverly, but our rapid march turned him back in great confusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowl
Doc. 86.-the fight at Barboursville, Va. July 12, 1861. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, accompanying Gen. Cox's division on the Kanawha, gives the following account of the taking possession of Barboursville, and the driving out of the secession troops by a portion of Col. Woodruff's regiment. At midnight on the night of the 12th inst., Col. Woodruff's companies A, B, D, F, and K were aroused from their slumbers, and placed under the command of Lieut.-Col. Neff, and, with one day's rations in their haversacks, they proceeded on their march — after a short but stirring address from Col. Woodruff. The column was conducted by a strong Union man, a resident of Barboursville, who had been driven thence some weeks since. It was proposed to make the attack at early daylight, but the deep silence observed along the route, together with the halts to send forward scouting parties, deferred their coming into sight of the enemy until the sun was two hours high. When t
Doc. 87.-Colonel Pegram's surrender. July 12, 1861. Gen. McClellan's report to Lieut.-Gen. Scott. Headquarters, Beverly, Va., July 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C.:-- I have received from Col. Pegram propositions for the surrender, with his officers and remnant of his command — say six hundred men. They are said to be extremely penitent, and determined never again to take up arms against the General Government. I shall have near nine hundred or one thousand prisoncounts make the loss of the rebels in killed some one hundred and fifty. G. B. McClellan, Major-General Department of Ohio. The following correspondence preceded the capitulation: near Tygart's valley River, six miles from Beverly, July 12, 1861. To Commanding Officer of Northern Forces, Beverly, Va.: sir: I write to state to you that I have, in consequence of the retreat of General Garnett, and the jaded and reduced condition of my command, most of them having been without food f
Doc. 193.-nurses in the National army. General orders, no. 59. war Department, Adjutant-General's office Washington, August 17, 1861. First. So much of paragraph three of special orders, No. one hundred eighty-five from this office, dated July 12, 1861, as relates to the allowances of female nurses employed in permanent or general hospitals, is hereby rescinded, and such persons will receive, from and after the 3d inst., forty cents per day and one ration in kind or by computation, at cost price, in lieu of all emoluments except transportation in kind. Second. The minimum standard of height for one recruits is fixed at five feet three inches, instead of five feet four and a half inches, as heretofore established. Third. Every officer of the army will immediately report his address to this office, and thereafter every change of address, no matter whether permanent or temporary. Fourth. All volunteers in the service of the United States will be mustered for pa