Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 14th, 1861 AD or search for July 14th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 88.-General McClellan's report. Huttonsville, Va., July 14, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Ass't Adjutant-General: General Garnett and his forces have been routed and his baggage and one gun taken. His army are completely demoralized. General Garnett was killed while attempting to rally his forces at Carrackford, near St. George. We have completely annihilated the enemy in Western Virginia. Our loss is but thirteen killed and not more than forty wounded, while the enemy's loill they had, in anticipation of a battle, dug a pit into which to throw the killed of the enemy, and labelled it For Union men. The same pit was filled with their own ghastly dead. flint. U. S. camp near Huttonville, Randolph Co., Va., Sunday, July 14, 1861 The campaign of Maj.-Gen. McClellan in Western Virginia has terminated in the complete destruction and rout of the rebel army. Sublime was Gov. Letcher's proclamation to the people of Western Virginia, and fearful was the retribution
Doc. 91.-report of Col. Davies. Headquarters, 2D brigade, 5TH Division, Alexandria, July 14, 1861. To Col. Miles, Commanding 5th Division Troops, Department of Northeastern Virginia. Sir::--In pursuance of your verbal order of yesterday, I made a reconnoissance on the Fairfax road, seven miles out, and on the Richmond road about ten miles, and on the Mount Vernon road as far as Mount Vernon. The pickets on the Fairfax road captured a newly-painted ambulance, containing a set of harness and two bags of buckwheat. On the curtain, on the inside, was distinctly written in pencil, John Hughes, Fairfax. The picket on the Richmond road saw three horsemen, who, by a dexterous turn, evaded a shot from the picket. The picket on the Mount Vernon road, in its diligence, discovered, on the premises of one John A. Washington, formerly a resident and still an occupant of a large estate near Mount Vernon, what was supposed to amount to eight thousand pounds of bacon, and seventy-five b