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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for July 21st, 1861 AD or search for July 21st, 1861 AD in all documents.

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iments to the generals and the troops. After listening to General Beauregard's account of the battle, he proposed that a brief despatch be sent to the War Department, which was done, that very night, in the following words: Manassa, July 21st, 1861. Night has closed upon a hard-fought field. Our forces have won a glorious victory. The enemy was routed, and fled precipitately, abandoning a very large amount of arms, munitions, knapsacks, and baggage. The ground was strewn for milhousand men. The facts that have transpired one by one, gradually throwing light upon this point, have already fallen within the domain of history, and show, conclusively, in spite of the extreme reticence of many Federal commanders, that an army fifty thousand strong, under General McDowell, was defeated and routed, at Manassas, on the 21st of July, 1861, by less than thirty thousand Confederate troops, under the immediate command, before and during the battle, of General G. T. Beauregard.
nst Washington. On the morning after the battle an order was issued by General Beauregard, recalling his troops to their organization, and assigning them new positions, with the advance—Bonham's brigade— at Centreville. Holmes's brigade, by direction of President Davis, was ordered back to its former position. See Appendix to this chapter. At the breakfast-table, on the same morning, the President handed General Beauregard the following graceful letter: Manassas, Va., July 21st, 1861. Sir,—Appreciating your services in the battle of Manassas and on several other occasions during the existing war, as affording the highest evidence of your skill as a commander, your gallantry as a soldier, and your zeal as a patriot, you are appointed to be General in the army of the Confederate States of America, and, with the consent of the Congress, will be duly commissioned accordingly. Yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. General G. T. Beauregard. On the 23d, Hunton's 8th<
essentially distinct military schools: General Beauregard, ever in favor of the aggressive, and of subjecting an adversary's movements to his own plans-General Johnston, ever on the defensive, and apparently awaiting the action of the enemy. On the 13th of August General Beauregard was officially informed, by the Hon. L. P. Walker, Secretary of War, of his appointment, by and with the advice and consent of Congress, as General in the army of the Confederate States, to take rank from July 21st, 1861. He gratefully accepted the high distinction thus conferred upon him by the President, who, it will be remembered, had not awaited the action of Congress to reward his services. The reader is aware that, on the 23d of August, General Beauregard again addressed the President See Chapter X. with regard to the insufficiency of subsistence for the army at Manassas. He also urged the sanitary benefits and economy of procuring for each company a good professional cook and baker, with
living. May your subsequent course be attended with like success. R. E. Lee. General Beauregard. The War Department and General Lee no doubt knew that such letters would have been altogether irrelevant had the hero of Manassas been General Johnston, and not General Beauregard, to whom they were addressed. Ask the survivors of that first battle of the war—be they Virginians, Carolinians, Georgians, Alabamians, Mississippians, Tennesseeans, or Louisianians—who led them, on the 21st of July, 1861; ask them, when, broken down by exhaustion and overwhelmed by numbers, they wavered and had all but lost the sense of their soldierly duties, who sprang before them, radiant with inspiriting valor, and, ordering their colors planted in their front, rallied them to these sacred emblems of country, honor, and liberty? We have written and reasoned in vain; we know not what sounds and what echoes move most the hearts of those who wore the gray, if one name—Beauregard's—is not the name t
vant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Appendix to Chapter IX. camp Pickens, July 21st, 1861. General,—General Jones's Adjutant comes in to report that the Federal troops are betweAdj.-Genl. (Received at about 6 1/2 o'clock P. M.) Manassas Junction, Va., July 21st, 1861. Sent at 5 1/2 h. A. M. General,—You will hold yourself in readiness to take the offenshe President has appointed you, by and with the advice of Congress, a General (to take rank July 21st, 1861) in the Army of the Confederate States. You are requested to signify your acceptance or no President of the Confederate States, with the advice and consent of Congress, to date from July 21st, 1861. I accept with gratitude said appointment, and will exert myself to the utmost to be desergive you, with pleasure., the following information. At the battle of Manassas, on the 21st of July, 1861, I found it difficult to distinguish our then Confederate flag from the United States flag