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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 21st, 1861 AD or search for July 21st, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
as now at our head. He soon reduced the high-spirited mob who rushed to the front at the first call of their native Virginia into the respectable Army of the Shenandoah, which he turned over to General Joseph E. Johnson when he came to take command of the department. Jackson won some reputation in several skirmishes in the lower valley, and at this time very small affairs were magnified into brilliant victories. When he became famous. But it was on the plains of first Manassas, July 21, 1861, that he first became famous. General McDowell had ably and skilfully outgeneraled Beauregard, and crossing the upped fords of Bull Run, had moved down on the Confederate flank, driving before him the small Confederate force stationed there. General Bee, in the agony of being driven back, galloped up to Jackson, who, in command of a Virginia brigade, was stationed on the Henry House hill, and exclaimed: General, they are beating us back! Jackson's eyes glittered beneath the rim
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. (search)
lor sergeant. Later Boyd was made second lieutenant; Brown, junior second lieutenant, and Private A. Updyke was elected second lieutenant. Captain Wheatley was promoted to major in October, and died of typhoid fever in December, 1861. We remained at Front Royal, drilling and having our uniforms made, until July, 1861, when on the 16th day of that month we reported to Colonel William Smith (Extra Billy) at Manassas Junction for duty. Battle of Manassas. On the morning of the 21st of July, 1861, we were bivouacked near the Lewis House, and within four hundred yards of the Henry House, which was destined to become the key to the great strategic move of that day, although I think it was a surprise to our generals, for they expected the conflict to take place about five or six miles to the right of it. We were, through sympathy occasioned by our awkward appearance, sent there to be out of harm's way, rather than as an outpost. We had just received our guns since our arrival at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The first Confederate Memorial day. From the Times-dispatch, July 15, 1906. (search)
Portsmouth, Va.; Richmond, Va., claim it. But the little village of Warrenton, Va., claims, and can prove it, the first Confederate Memorial Day. Killed in skirmish at Fairfax Courthouse, June 1, 1861, Captain John Quincy Marr, Warrenton Rifles, 17th Virginia Regiment, buried in the little village graveyard, June 3rd, with military honors; wept over by the old and young; flowers strewn on his grave, and the first Confederate Memorial Day was observed. After the first battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, the dead and mortally wounded, numbering many, were brought to this same little village, and again memorial day was observed by the women and children. Was this, the women's work, discontinued? No, organized; no, but the spontaneous outburst of the Rachels throughout the land weeping for her children and would not be comforted. The graves of these dead after the battle of Manassas were hastily marked on mere headboards. The living had to be cared for, and only a little band of wome